hierarchy

(redirected from subordinate)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to subordinate: subordinate debt

hi·er·ar·chy

(hī'ĕr-ar-kē, hī-rar'kē),
1. Any system of people or things ranked one above the other.
2. In psychology and psychiatry, an organization of habits or concepts in which simpler components are combined to form increasingly complex integrations.
[G. hierarchia, rule or power of the high priest]

hierarchy

(hī′ə-rär′kē, hī′rär′-)
n. pl. hierar·chies
1. A group of persons or things organized into successive ranks or grades with each level subordinate to the one above: a career spent moving up through the military hierarchy.
2. Categorization or arrangement of a group of people or things into such ranks or grades: classification by hierarchy; discounting the effects of hierarchy.
3. A group of animals in which certain members or subgroups dominate or submit to others.

hi·er·ar·chy

(hī'ĕr-ahr-kē)
1. Any system of people or things ranked one above the other.
2. psychology/psychiatry An organization of habits or concepts in which simpler components are combined to form increasingly complex integrations.
[G. hierarchia, rule or power of the high priest]

hierarchy

(in CLASSIFICATION) the system of ranking in a graded order from species to kingdom. see HIGHER CATEGORY.

hi·er·ar·chy

(hī'ĕr-ahr-kē)
Any system of people or things ranked one above the other.
[G. hierarchia, rule or power of the high priest]

hierarchy

order of superiority; the arrangement of echelons of command.

court hierarchy
the way in which the courts in a country are arranged so that appeals can be carried from the lower to the higher courts.
References in periodicals archive ?
If physicians who have swapped suit coats for lab coats are going to make a meaningful contribution in managing health care organizations, they must be able to communicate (influence) their subordinates and other organizational members in ways that will help bridge the gap between management and medicine.
Persuasion Strategies for Physician Executives: Part II--Influencing Subordinates .
Most police executives, however, have only vague perceptions of their supervisors' performance, particularly in terms of their ability to develop and supervise subordinates.
These activities include facilitating a productive work environment and developing subordinates to their full potential.
Consequently, executives see managers and supervisors differently than subordinates do.
Whereas Part I examined physician executives' strategic preferences in situations in which targets of influence were superiors with attractive or unattractive communicator styles, the current investigation explores whether there are any significant differences in the way physician executives go about influencing subordinates who communicate in an attractive style (i.
It is not only important to examine the significant differences between the way physician executives use influence strategies with attractive and unattractive subordinates and superiors, but also worthwhile to examine the rankings of the strategies associated with the two targets (see figure 4, p.
Coalition was another popular strategy in persuading subordinates and superiors.