suborder


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suborder

 [sub´or-der]
a taxonomic category sometimes established, subordinate to an order and superior to a family.

sub·or·der

(sŭb-ōr'dĕr),
In biologic classification, a division between order and family.

suborder

(sŭb′ôr′dər)
n.
1. Biology A taxonomic category of related organisms ranking below an order and above a family.
2. A subdivision of a category termed an order.

sub·or·der

(sŭb'ōr-dĕr)
In biologic classification, a division between order and family.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although these results are unsurprising, the groupings described show the strength of various Suborder and Great Group characters and identify them as useful characters that should be retained.
According to Johnson (1976), in the Jurassic carbonate platforms the representatives of the suborder Lagenina attaint the maximum diversity in the middle and inner part of the platforms.
However, when assessing suborders, specialist Anisoptera were significantly more likely to be uncommon/rare than generalist Anisoptera ([chi square] = 8.0, df=1, P = 0.005).
Two orders or suborders (Orthoptera and Homoptera) of collected spiders and insects were only herbivorous, 3 orders (Araneae, Odonata, and Neuroptera) were only predaceous, and 4 orders or suborders (Heteroptera, Coleoptera, Diptera, and Hymenoptera) included both trophic levels.
Relationships among the four suborders of beetles remain unsettled (e.g., see Crowson, 1960; Lawrence and Newton, 1982; Lawrence et al., 1995).
The abridged soil Suborder classes as predicted by GARP and CT across the whole catchment are shown as smoothed (filtered by 5 by 5 cell majority) digital maps in Fig.
Why does the suborder classification of Mollisols continuously change as you go from east to west?
1998) vertical relationships of layers and presence of acidic surface and deep sulfidic layers Numbers refer to occurrences in the database; n.c., not classified during the risk map survey; n.a.c., no available class Order Suborder Great Group Hydrosol (256) Intertidal (15) Sulfidic (15) Supratidal (29) Sulfuric (3) Sulfidic (26) Extratidal (68) Sulfuric (4) Sulfidic (64) Salic (2) Sulfidic (2) Redoxic (85) Sulfuric (35) Sulfidic (37) Kurosolic (2) Sodosolic (3) Chromosolic (2) Tenosolic (2) Rudosolic (2) n.c (2) Oxyaquic (49) Sulfuric (11) Sulfidic (37) Tenosolic (1) n.c.
Two species were collected by 2 collectors, mentioned below, and thereafter identified by Charles Lienhard, Museum of Natural History, Geneva, Switzerland, as Ectopsocus briggsi from Ectopsocidae, and Trichopsocus dahi from Trichopsocidae, both families belonging to the infraorder Homilopsocidea, and suborder Psocomorpha (= Eupsocida).
Dermatophilaceae) of the suborder Micrococcineae (5).
Both sides in the controversy would thus be vindicated: Ambulocetus, Pakicetus, and their more fully marine descendants in the extinct whale suborder Archaeoceti would in fact be descended from mesonychians, while the two extant whale suborders would share a common ancestor (probably more recently) with hippopotamoid artiodactyls.