subliminal self


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sub·lim·i·nal self

the sum of the mental processes that take place without the person's conscious knowledge.
Synonym(s): subconscious mind

sub·lim·i·nal self

(sŭb-limi-năl self)
Sum of the mental processes that take place without the person's conscious knowledge.

subliminal self

In psychoanalytical theory, part of the normal individual's personality in which mental processes function without consciousness, under normal waking conditions.
References in periodicals archive ?
In Why I Believe in Personal Immortality (1928), for example, he claimed that individual personalities persist after death as part of a larger whole, the whole being comprised of "perhaps a larger or more subliminal self, parts of which may possibly be liable to some modified form of reincarnation hereafter." (53) If even Oliver Lodge, Britain's foremost authority on Spiritualism in the interwar period, acknowledged the existence of a collective immortality, then one can presume that many others did so as well.
In partaking in this wider field of thought, a "penumbral" region of the mind providing seemingly infinite combinations of ideas, the subliminal self emerges, not surprisingly, as vastly superior to the self of the prosaic light of day.
In both hypnosis and hysteria the subliminal self acquired a notion such as anesthesia or paralysis that was then conveyed to the supraliminal.
Neither evolution nor heredity, Myers believed, shaped the nature of the subliminal self. These faculties were part of our pre-terrene heritage, part of our spiritual nature.
In Myers's view telekinesis was a variant of motor automatisms directed by the subliminal self (Vol.
English psychologist George Frederick Stout (1903) felt that many of the facts Myers presented to support his idea of the subliminal self could be explained in other ways.
These authors referred to the subliminal self as an important concept in psychical research.
The emphasis is on preconscious processing, a concept different from Myers's subliminal self. These psychologists, Tallis (2002) points out in his brief account of the development of cognitive psychology and its relationship to the concept of the unconscious mind, "were using the more restrained vocabulary of computer science.
Explorations of those sub-selves or independent cognitive systems that Hilgard (1986) has called the "hidden observer" in hypnosis, and that Watkins and Watkins (1986) referred to as ego states, could be related to the concept of the subliminal self or at least explored with that viewpoint in mind.
Similarly, modern research and theorization on hallucinations (Bentall, 2000), hypnosis (Fromm & Nash, 1992), and creativity (Sternberg, 1999), for example, do not depend for the most part on the concepts of sensory automatisms, suggestions on the subliminal self, or subliminal uprushes.