subliminal perception


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subliminal perception

The reception of stimuli, often complex or verbal and usually visual, that are presented for such a short time as to be barely noticed or unnoticed. Such stimuli can, however, influence behaviour and present potential opportunities for abuse. The conclusion, now verified by physiological research, that consciousness and information transmission may involve different systems that can operate independently has major implications for psychology and philosophy and has aroused much controversy.
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(20.) Moore-"Subliminal Perception" Facts and Fallacy, by Timothy Moore, Skeptical Inquirer, Vol.
This coincides with data frequently demonstrated before in various studies of subliminal perception.
In general, the literature on subliminal perception shows that the most clearly documented effects are obtained only in highly contrived and artificial situations" (Moore 1982, 46).
Two weeks later, as part of a separate module concerned with the evaluation of empirical literature, participants were randomly given either the ESP or subliminal perception version of the report which they were to evaluate.
Subliminal perception gained wide attention and prominence in the 1950's when some advertiser claimed that people can not only register subliminal impression of brand names of goods, but that they could be motivated to buy specific products.
"Another Look At Subliminal Perception." Journal of Advertising Research 19, 1 (1979): 55-57
Various attempts have been made to relate these experiences to subliminal perception, fantasy proneness, and dissociation (see, e.g., Irwin, 1990, 1994) and the development of the Transliminality Scale is an attempt to find a common ground.
One prominent scientist has even suggested that subliminal perception may be only a kind of laboratory freak with no practical importance and only rare occurrence in everyday life (Bargh, 1992).
This reflection was enhanced by pondering the parallels between the discovery of new personal meaning in clinical psychological work and discovering sensorily unavailable meaning in the parapsychology experiment (Carpenter, 1988), as well as parallels between research in subliminal perception and in extrasensory perception.
The same may be said of the relationship of ESP and subliminal perception (Roney-Dougal, 1986).
Chapter 3, "Paradoxical Awareness and Pathological Awareness," includes brief descriptions of a number of experiments, some of them classics in so-called subliminal perception. Rao sketches some important illustrative research examples on this topic, which is a domain now likely to be called by some other names, such as subception.