sublime

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sub·lime

(sŭb-līm'),
1. To sublimate.
2. To undergo a process of sublimation.

sublime

/sub·lime/ (sub-līm´) to volatilize a solid body by heat and then to collect it in a purified form as a solid or powder.

sublime

(sŭb-līm′) [L. sublimis, to the limit]
To evaporate a substance directly from the solid into the vapor state and condense it again. For example, metallic iodine on heating does not liquefy but directly forms a violet gas.
References in periodicals archive ?
From the trunk of that tree of vengefulness and hatred, Jewish hatred--the profoundest and sublimest kind of hatred, capable of creating ideals and reversing values, the like of which has never existed on earth before--there grew something equally incomparable, a new love, the profoundest and sublimest kind of love--and from what other trunk could it have grown?
It is the sublimest and happiest time I have ever had in my life.
Hazlitt's dramatization of coach travel also everts the imperial image of the Royal Mail as "the sublimest object" (as he describes mail-coaches in "The Letter-Bell," anticipating De Quincey [207]).
BORIS JOHNSON went to Wimbledon last week and described the All England Tennis Club as "the sublimest thing this country has to offer".
His problem was 'believing / everything he read, the divinest poets / told the sublimest lies' (p.
They dare to parallel (engraven everywhere on the walls of their building and read as the substance of every service) the sublimest utterances of Holy Writ, the choice words of Jesus Christ and St.
The sublimest ideas are given of the Deity; he is spoken of with the deepest reverence, and yet with all the warmth and pathos of personal gratitude and affection.
8) For murder to be considered art, it must of course be useless, as in the example of John Williams's mass-murders of the Marr and Williamson families in Ratcliffe Highway, London, throughout the December of 1811 (considered by De Quincey 'the sublimest and most entire in their excellence that ever were committed'): (9)