sublimate

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sublimate

 [sub´lĭ-māt]
1. a substance obtained by sublimation.
2. to accomplish sublimation.

sub·li·mate

(sŭb'li-māt),
1. To perform or accomplish sublimation.
2. Any substance that has been submitted to sublimation.
[L. sublimo, pp. -atus, to raise on high, fr. sublimis, high]

sublimate

(sŭb′lə-māt′)
v. subli·mated, subli·mating, subli·mates
v.intr. Chemistry
To be transformed directly from the solid to the gaseous state or from the gaseous to the solid state without becoming a liquid.
v.tr.
1. Chemistry To cause (a solid or gas) to sublimate.
2.
a. To modify the natural expression of (a primitive, instinctual impulse) in a socially acceptable manner.
b. To divert the energy associated with (an unacceptable impulse or drive) into an acceptable activity.
n.
Chemistry A product of sublimation.

sub′li·ma′tion (-mā′shən) n.

sub·li·mate

(sŭb'lim-āt)
1. To perform or accomplish sublimation.
2. Any substance that has been submitted to sublimation.
[L. sublimo, pp. -atus, to raise on high, fr. sublimis, high]

sub·li·mate

(sŭb'lim-āt)
1. To perform or accomplish sublimation.
2. Any substance submitted to sublimation.
[L. sublimo, pp. -atus, to raise on high, fr. sublimis, high]
References in periodicals archive ?
If, as Monique David-Menard points out, "Disgust in hysteria exhibits, at the heart of the conversion symptom, a passionate denial of sexual difference that seeks to attribute to the other a kind of responsibility for having spoiled sexuality" (1989, 103), Freud's theory of sublimation itself rests on that hysterical attribution to the woman.
The vicissitudes of sublimation are also given an anal tone in the course of Freud's description of narcissism in "The Ego and the Id" (1923).
If Freud was following the logic of male desire in his narrative of the origin of sublimation as a reactive response to the female body, perhaps we need another narrative to account for female sublimation.