sublimate


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sublimate

 [sub´lĭ-māt]
1. a substance obtained by sublimation.
2. to accomplish sublimation.

sub·li·mate

(sŭb'li-māt),
1. To perform or accomplish sublimation.
2. Any substance that has been submitted to sublimation.
[L. sublimo, pp. -atus, to raise on high, fr. sublimis, high]

sublimate

/sub·li·mate/ (sub´lĭ-māt)
1. a substance obtained by sublimation.
2. to accomplish sublimation.

sublimate

(sŭb′lə-māt′)
v. subli·mated, subli·mating, subli·mates
v.intr. Chemistry
To be transformed directly from the solid to the gaseous state or from the gaseous to the solid state without becoming a liquid.
v.tr.
1. Chemistry To cause (a solid or gas) to sublimate.
2.
a. To modify the natural expression of (a primitive, instinctual impulse) in a socially acceptable manner.
b. To divert the energy associated with (an unacceptable impulse or drive) into an acceptable activity.
n.
Chemistry A product of sublimation.

sub′li·ma′tion (-mā′shən) n.

sublimate

[sub′limāt]
Etymology: L, sublimare, to lift up
to refine or divert instinctual impulses and energy from their immediate goal to one that can be expressed in a social, moral, or aesthetic manner acceptable to the person and the society.

sub·li·mate

(sŭb'lim-āt)
1. To perform or accomplish sublimation.
2. Any substance that has been submitted to sublimation.
[L. sublimo, pp. -atus, to raise on high, fr. sublimis, high]

sub·li·mate

(sŭb'lim-āt)
1. To perform or accomplish sublimation.
2. Any substance submitted to sublimation.
[L. sublimo, pp. -atus, to raise on high, fr. sublimis, high]

sublimate

1. a substance obtained by sublimation.
2. to accomplish sublimation.
References in periodicals archive ?
FEV is currently investigating future applications, including diesel fuel as a heated fluid to sublimate the ammonia carbamate, that have the potential to take advantage of this newly developed system.
But the water ice needs higher temperatures to sublimate, so a fine-grained layer of water ice gradually forms hiding the carbon dioxide ice still lying beneath it.
The most telling aspect of the work is its very real concern that, as humans harness the power of technology, they will sublimate their morality and their souls.
The image on the paper was then transferred to polyester fabric, using heat and pressure to sublimate the image into the fabric.
Just the list of contributors to the reader accompanying "High & Low," Rosalind Krauss suggested, pointed to a repeat of the "sublimation model" that had driven Rubin's 1984 debacle--in which, as Krauss explained, art is celebrated for its ability "to sublimate or transform experience, raising it from ordinary to extraordinary, from commonplace to unique, from low to high; with the special genius of the artist being that he or she has the gifts to perform this function.
Using a heat press, the image and material is exposed to high temperatures and pressure which cause the toner to sublimate.
Other ambitious young artists might have been content go to the studio, tack up a poster of Harry Houdini, a postcard of Robert Smithson's Spiral Jetty, and the famous image of Richard Serra flinging molten lead like Vulcan in his forge, and sublimate.
Anyone who sees them as such is obviously projecting those sentiments on them in an attempt to sublimate, to make socially acceptable, imagery that Saul has gone out of his way to render impossible to accept in that way.
This advocacy suggests the ability of formally resolved art to do more than offer a snooze in Matisse's comfy armchair: to promote civilized discourse, create joy, increase sensory acuity, sublimate discord, foster a "beau monde.
But data-driven architectures operate at another level that sublimates rather than externalizes the normativity that directs and coordinates interactions.
The standout segment from this collection was The Robot Fixer, featuring a stoic mother (a note-perfect Wai Ching Ho) who sublimates her grief for her comatosed son by completing his childhood collection of toy robots.