sublation

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sub·la·tion

(sŭb-lā'shŭn),
Detachment, elevation, or removal of a part.
[L. sublatio, a lifting up]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

sub·la·tion

(sŭb-lā'shŭn)
Detachment, elevation, or removal of a part.
[L. sublatio, a lifting up]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

sublation

(sub-la'shun) [L. sublatio, elevation]
The displacement, elevation, or removal of a part. Synonym: sublatio
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore, death itself is that situation in which the master sublates the history of the other and attains a pure act of dominance.
Yet, in so doing, empirical consciousness initiates the process by which it will sublate itself.
Therefore, while untimeliness is an ontological a priori, Derrida is concerned that too often theorists and practitioners attempt to marginalize and/or sublate untimeliness because it points to the contingency of privileged ways of ordering reality including systems, structures, rules, roles, codes, etc.
As Francoise Lionnet reminds us, "the female subject must now learn to create new images" that are "vivid enough to superimpose themselves on the old myths they mean to transform and sublate" (215).
He urges us to be ~hesitant to endow one element of a pair with the power wholly to sublate much less to efface the other' (66), an admonition that shows why feminists take some comfort in deconstruction.
These strange birds sublate all their longings, strivings, and thinking into these little verbal structures we call poems.
Instead of focusing on "Melville as an author," Deming examines "how 'Hawthorne and His Mosses' interacts with Mosses from an Old Manse" and "breach[es] textual boundaries." The titular dwelling in "Old Manse" represents "not merely Hawthorne's residence" but also the author himself; it becomes a "figured and figural site of the interior struggle for self-consciousness, which Hawthorne's persona creates as a type for itself, and which Melville's persona appropriates for its own process of embodiment and exteriorization." Melville "literally uses passages and paraphrases from Mosses from an Old Manse in order to represent Hawthorne and his text" and "intensifies desire for Hawthorne in order to assimilate his authority and thereby sublate him.
If such pathology is suspect as some odiously positivist residuum, why sublate paranoia as Pfau would like to, smuggling it into critical parlance stripped of its historical association with psychosomatic illness?
Yet Hegel's phenomenology, which attempts to confront and sublate Kant's transcendental idealism and which in many respects is devoted to the power of change, effectively does no better since it can only conceive of the latter in keeping with "law": conceptual grasping, a positive dialectic, teleological movement, and absolute knowledge.
In discussing performative documentary, Nichols insists on the centrality of "(t)he ethnopoetics of Jean Rouch, who has consistently argued for, and embodied, a style of filmmaking that does not so much as combine the subjective and objective poles of traditional ethnography as sublate them into a distinct form." (19) This distinct form that Rouch lays down could be reasonably described in the terms I have earlier used for Obomsawin: a balance between clear, detailed understanding and emotional force.
The gendering of a feminine matter and masculine form in philosophical discourse underwrites the practice of allegory, which must find a way to sublate matter into form.
Whereas Benn had his "Ligurian complex" to sublate the cynicism of analytic intelligence into poetry, Grunbein's analytic poems, without such moments, become, however forcefully, prosaic, dominated by the ideas for which they serve as vehicle.