subjective

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subjective

 [sub-jek´tiv]
perceived only by the affected individual and not by the examiner.

sub·jec·tive

(sŭb-jek'tiv),
1. Perceived only by the patient only and not evident to the examiner; said of certain symptoms, such as pain.
2. Colored by one's personal beliefs and attitudes. Compare: objective (2).
[L. subjectivus, fr. subjicio, to throw under]

subjective

/sub·jec·tive/ (sub-jek´tiv) pertaining to or perceived only by the affected individual; not perceptible to the senses of another person.

subjective

(səb-jĕk′tĭv)
adj.
1. Psychology Not caused by external stimuli.
2. Medicine Of, relating to, or designating a symptom or complaint perceived by a patient.

sub·jec′tive·ly adv.
sub·jec′tive·ness, sub′jec·tiv′i·ty (sŭb′jĕk-tĭv′ĭ-tē) n.

subjective

[-jek′tiv]
Etymology: L, subjectus, subject
1 pertaining to the essential nature of an object as perceived in the mind rather than to a thing in itself.
2 existing only in the mind.
3 that which arises within or is perceived by the individual, as contrasted with something that is modified by external circumstances or something that may be evaluated by objective standards.
4 pertaining to a person who places excessive importance on his own moods, attitudes, or opinions; egocentric.

sub·jec·tive

(sŭb-jek'tiv)
1. Perceived by the patient only and not evident to the examiner; said of certain symptoms, such as pain.
2. Colored by one's personal beliefs and attitudes.
Compare: objective (2)
[L. subjectivus, fr. subjicio, to throw under]

sub·jec·tive

(sŭb-jek'tiv)
1. Perceived only by patient and not evident to examiner.
2. Colored by personal beliefs and attitudes.
[L. subjectivus, fr. subjicio, to throw under]

subjective

perceived only by one examiner and not necessarily by any other examiner.

subjective probability
see subjective probability.

Patient discussion about subjective

Q. I need some advice on how to bring up the subject? How do I approach my doctor about depression? I believe that I’m depressed. I did some research and have found some symptoms of the depression match what I have. I go for days without sleep, and then sleep for more than 18 hours straight. My eating habits are all off. I have no hope for the future, I know I need help, but how do I bring this up? I have been too shy to do so before, and haven't told anyone how I feel. I need some advice on how to bring up the subject?

A. You did a very good job with what you said in your post. A++ and a couple of gold stars.

Just tell that to your doctor. Doctors usually have heard it all, so there is no reason to hold back. Just blurt it out. Get it out into the open. I seriously doubt your doctor's response will be negative. If its depression you have, your doctor can easily treat you. Medications can get you stabilized and life can get better with it. You would be very surprised if you only knew just how many people are really taking depression medication. It makes me smile every time I remember that. So many people are secretive about it. But there's no good reason for that. Lots and lots of people have gone through periods of depression. Abraham Lincoln was one of those people. You may find that you have gotten used to the "depressed you" and after taking medication for a couple of weeks, the "non-depressed you" will start to come back and it will seem a little strange. Others may notice a d

Q. what is the right diet for a diabetic people? where can i find guiding on the subject?

A. To be under control for Type2 diabetic persons is go away from carbs, fats, sweets, rise ...etc.and to get meals of rich garden salad and fruits, but not fruits contains glucose.Also to get used on daily exercises and the best is to have not less than 45 minutes walking at least 3 times per week.

Q. I’m doing a dissertation on alcoholism and I’m looking for recent books written on the subject? Looking for recent books written about alcoholism, need some up to date books with recent research on the subject. Does anyone recommend or know of any.

A. There is a recent true book called Mother's Ruin by Nicola Barry which is a bout alcoholism. And also the writer Augusten Burroughs writes a lot about alcohol Hope this helps.

More discussions about subjective
References in periodicals archive ?
Indeed, historians in and of the modern era must not allow the dominant culture's mystification of work and class to define their work; rather, they must make the problematic character of worker and middle-class subjectivities and all forms of work the subject of their interrogation.
So when I recommend that you look forward to the (continuing) sense of always having been here, construe that you not as a particular person but as the condition of awareness, which, although manifesting itself in finite subjectivities, nevertheless always finds itself present.
Subjectivities is not a history in the sense of a narrative or systematic survey of British subjectivities in the period 1832-1920.
While in The Acoustic Mirror she observes that "classic cinema" promotes a disparity between "woman's lack, specularity, and (diegetic) containment" as opposed to male "potency, vision, and (diegetic) exteriority" (149), in Male Subjectivity Silverman goes beyond this dichotomy of visual images of men and women to problematize the whole issue of visual representation in cinema, suggesting that cinematic representations of male and female subjectivities evoke and suggest their own negations and contradictions.
Understandings of witches and their magic were connected both to gender and to the individual subjectivities that Roper is so eager to describe.
In the first section of the book, Estrin demonstrates how these multiple plots and subjectivities work in Petrarch.
The author inflexibly espouses the view that universals are bad, multiple subjectivities are good, autonomous individualism is bad, social identity formation is good, and any deviation from these mantras invites her opprobrium.
The Short Century" aims to explore the manifold subjectivities and modernities engendered by African liberation.
They called attention to the seductive potential of their poetic icons in an effort to fashion Reformed subjectivities capable of reading signs rightly.
In turn, this examination of colonial visual cultural history motivates Syrotinski to explore the role played by gender in the identities and subjectivities of female Francophone African writers.
They are utterly unlike those who populate the work of Larry Clark or Nan Goldin; no privileged view into bohemia, no focused subjectivities excuse the Chapmans' gratuitous sideshow.