subjective

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subjective

 [sub-jek´tiv]
perceived only by the affected individual and not by the examiner.

sub·jec·tive

(sŭb-jek'tiv),
1. Perceived only by the patient only and not evident to the examiner; said of certain symptoms, such as pain.
2. Colored by one's personal beliefs and attitudes. Compare: objective (2).
[L. subjectivus, fr. subjicio, to throw under]

subjective

/sub·jec·tive/ (sub-jek´tiv) pertaining to or perceived only by the affected individual; not perceptible to the senses of another person.

subjective

(səb-jĕk′tĭv)
adj.
1. Psychology Not caused by external stimuli.
2. Medicine Of, relating to, or designating a symptom or complaint perceived by a patient.

sub·jec′tive·ly adv.
sub·jec′tive·ness, sub′jec·tiv′i·ty (sŭb′jĕk-tĭv′ĭ-tē) n.

subjective

[-jek′tiv]
Etymology: L, subjectus, subject
1 pertaining to the essential nature of an object as perceived in the mind rather than to a thing in itself.
2 existing only in the mind.
3 that which arises within or is perceived by the individual, as contrasted with something that is modified by external circumstances or something that may be evaluated by objective standards.
4 pertaining to a person who places excessive importance on his own moods, attitudes, or opinions; egocentric.

sub·jec·tive

(sŭb-jek'tiv)
1. Perceived by the patient only and not evident to the examiner; said of certain symptoms, such as pain.
2. Colored by one's personal beliefs and attitudes.
Compare: objective (2)
[L. subjectivus, fr. subjicio, to throw under]

sub·jec·tive

(sŭb-jek'tiv)
1. Perceived only by patient and not evident to examiner.
2. Colored by personal beliefs and attitudes.
[L. subjectivus, fr. subjicio, to throw under]

subjective

perceived only by one examiner and not necessarily by any other examiner.

subjective probability
see subjective probability.

Patient discussion about subjective

Q. I need some advice on how to bring up the subject? How do I approach my doctor about depression? I believe that I’m depressed. I did some research and have found some symptoms of the depression match what I have. I go for days without sleep, and then sleep for more than 18 hours straight. My eating habits are all off. I have no hope for the future, I know I need help, but how do I bring this up? I have been too shy to do so before, and haven't told anyone how I feel. I need some advice on how to bring up the subject?

A. You did a very good job with what you said in your post. A++ and a couple of gold stars.

Just tell that to your doctor. Doctors usually have heard it all, so there is no reason to hold back. Just blurt it out. Get it out into the open. I seriously doubt your doctor's response will be negative. If its depression you have, your doctor can easily treat you. Medications can get you stabilized and life can get better with it. You would be very surprised if you only knew just how many people are really taking depression medication. It makes me smile every time I remember that. So many people are secretive about it. But there's no good reason for that. Lots and lots of people have gone through periods of depression. Abraham Lincoln was one of those people. You may find that you have gotten used to the "depressed you" and after taking medication for a couple of weeks, the "non-depressed you" will start to come back and it will seem a little strange. Others may notice a d

Q. what is the right diet for a diabetic people? where can i find guiding on the subject?

A. To be under control for Type2 diabetic persons is go away from carbs, fats, sweets, rise ...etc.and to get meals of rich garden salad and fruits, but not fruits contains glucose.Also to get used on daily exercises and the best is to have not less than 45 minutes walking at least 3 times per week.

Q. I’m doing a dissertation on alcoholism and I’m looking for recent books written on the subject? Looking for recent books written about alcoholism, need some up to date books with recent research on the subject. Does anyone recommend or know of any.

A. There is a recent true book called Mother's Ruin by Nicola Barry which is a bout alcoholism. And also the writer Augusten Burroughs writes a lot about alcohol Hope this helps.

More discussions about subjective
References in periodicals archive ?
The subjectivist position is similar to what Cratylus produced in Plato's dialogue by that name.
In this 1965 lecture Popper uses the example of the subjectivist interpretation of information theory to argue that information can be interpreted objectivistically.
Some subjectivists about well-being argue that the state ought to pursue well-being policies, but that it can do so justifiably only if it promotes everyone's wellbeing as they themselves see it.
Through the integration of an approach emphasizing a micro-level examination of social life and the effect of a single (albeit incredibly powerful) structure on individual choices, it is possible to teach the concept of structure in classrooms dominated by a subjectivist ontology.
From the principles of non-existence of metaphysical assumptions about the true nature of probability, and in order to evaluate the explicit explanatory capacity of the frequentist, subjectivist and propensionalist models, the corresponding criteria of falsification were developed as a means to contrast the correlation between a probabilistic theory and the corresponding model obtained from the observable results of the phenomena (9).
Subjectivists would argue that because knowledge is confined to ideas in the mind of the person, it is impossible to get beyond these ideas to an objective reality.
to interpret statements about probability: frequentist and subjectivist.
In fact, I think it can be doubted whether Hume's view is properly a theory of ethics at all, as it has absolutely no answer to Lewis's charge that subjectivist ethics is unable to account for the word "ought.
The sound of falling timber and its historical reverberations instantly turn Berkeley's subjectivist argument against objective causality on its head.
The subjectivist approach fits into the personality ideal, and indirect frequentism fits well with this framework.
This subjectivist thinking was somewhat foreign to the average "pre-Humanae vitae Catholic" who seemed to possess, in their more pronounced poverty, a more profound sense of their true religious obligation in regards to having children.
Lonergan's theory, despite his own intentions, seems de facto subjectivist and individualist, rather than intersubjective.