subgroup


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subgroup

(sŭb′gro͞op′)
n.
1. A distinct group within a group; a subdivision of a group.
2. A subordinate group.
3. Mathematics A group that is a subset of a group.
tr.v. sub·grouped, sub·grouping, sub·groups
To divide into subgroups.

subgroup

(sŭb′groop″)
In a research study a selected population of patients who share one or more common traits and thus can be distinguished from the rest of the individuals investigated.
References in periodicals archive ?
Compared with that in the saline treatment subgroup of control group, the 5-HT[sub]2AR levels of platelet lysate significantly increased in saline treatment subgroup of MI + depression group ( P = 0.
The highest similarity index recorded was between adult resistant subgroup and resistant members of adult susceptible subgroup, being 0.
The benefit adjustment subgroup does not yet have any meeting dates on its section of the NAIC's website.
s]) be the number of subgroup, then there will be N/M subgroups.
In LCA, the probability of belonging to each subgroup is calculated for each child and, assuming that the a priori probabilities of latent class membership are equal, a child is assigned to the subgroup for which his or her probability is highest.
In subgroups A1 and B1 the mean number of blood vessels between the experimental and control subgroup was insignificant (pgreater than 0.
Nor has the academic literature fully engaged with the doctrinal and theoretical implications of subgroup due process claims.
12 subgroup and the phylogenetic pattern of a long branch leading to a polytomy with genetic homogeneity point to a possible adaptive advantage for this subgroup.
Also, N/N' is an abelian normal subgroup of G/N' and the factor group is a 2-group.
Let G be a neat-subgroup of A, and K(G,A) denote the set of all subgroup H [?
Here we describe various ideas in group theory which can be illuminated by looking at group tables and subgroup diagrams of specific groups.