suberin


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suberin

(so͞o′bər-ĭn)
n.
A waxy waterproof substance present in the cell walls of certain plant tissues, especially cork.

suberin

a complex of fatty substances present in the wall of cork tissue that waterproofs it and makes it resistant to decay.
References in periodicals archive ?
lignin suberin and other compounds present in the woody plants make the digestion very difficult and thus produce low biogas yields [21].
In mature stage, the exodermis and endodermis may develop suberin lamellae and thick, secondary walls, preventing ion movement through the symplast.
Suberin is a polymer in the underground parts and at wounded areas of such plants.
A tomato peroxidase involved in the synthesis of lignin and suberin.
Table 1: Types of Fiber Polysaccharides/Oligosaccharides Carbohydrate Fibers Lignans (non-starch) Cellulose Indigestible Waxes dextrins Hemicellulose Resistant Phytate maltodextrins Arabinoxylans Resistant potato Cutin dextrins Arabinogalactans Synthesized Saponins carbohydrates Polyfructoses Polydextrose Suberin Inulin Methyl cellulose Tannins Oligofructans Hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose Galacto-oligosaccharides Resistant starches Gums Mucilages Pectins Adapted from Lattimer and Haub 2010
The cork cells are composed mainly of suberin, lignin (40% and 22%, respectively), and of cellulose of 9% [2].
In terms of chemical composition, bark differs from wood by the presence of polyphenols and suberin, a lower percentage of polysaccharides, and a higher percentage of extractives (Weissmann 1983, Fengel and Wegener 1984, Sjostrom 1993, Rowell 2007).
Diet quality encompasses energy value, protein, water, mineral and vitamin contents as well as anti-nutritional factors such as lignin, cutin, suberin, silica and secondary metabolites (Robbins 1983).
Using Suberin As Coupling Agent Through a Reactive Extrusion
Plant cell walls strengthened by deposition of macromolecules such as cellulose, lignin, suberin, and cellose together with sclerenchymatous fibers make a plant resistant to mechanical injury as well as to the tearing action of mandibles or the penetration of piercing-sucking mouthparts (Schoonhoven et al.
In Brief: While proving a long-held theory that suberin blocks water and nutrient absorption in plants, a Purdue University scientist learned more about manipulating the substance to better feed plants.