subdeltoid

sub·del·toid

(sŭb-del'toyd),
Beneath the deltoid muscle; denoting a bursa.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

subdeltoid

(sŭb-dĕl′toyd) [″ + Gr. delta, letter d, + eidos, form, shape]
Beneath the deltoid muscle.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
[6,7] Periarticular shoulder disorders include a number of different diseases, such as subacromial bursitis and subdeltoid bursitis, rotator cuff diphtheria, calcified tendinitis, and rotator cuff tear with or without adhesive capsulitis that can cause shoulder pain and motion restrictions.
Subacromial and subdeltoid bursitis were evaluated.
An MRI study to evaluate optimal intramuscular needle length in pediatric patients found that the IAC-recommended needle lengths still allowed penetration of the subdeltoid space in a substantial number of patients.
* Loss of peribursal or subdeltoid fat plane and fluid in subacromial-subdeltoid bursa.
Caption: Figure 2: MRI of the right shoulder showing large subacromial subdeltoid fluid collection with the so-called rice bodies.
The existence of either a subdeltoid bursal effusion (SBE) (Figure 2) or a biceps peritendon effusion (BPE) was seen significantly more often among the group 1 patients.
The subdeltoid bursa (SDB) and subcoracoid bursa (SCB) were scanned with the shoulder in a neutral position, whereas the subacromial bursa (SAB) was scanned with the shoulder in a modified Crass position.
Adhesion of the subacromial and subdeltoid was detached carefully by inserting finger or sponge.
Additionally, patients with PMR were more likely to have abnormal ultrasound findings in their shoulders (especially subdeltoid bursitis and biceps tenosynovitis), and hips (synovitis and/or trochanteric bursitis).
On examination, the patient's right shoulder manifested a marked effusion anterior to the deltoid muscle that extended to the subdeltoid region (see Figures A, B).
* During normal movement into elevation, the subdeltoid component of the subacromial bursa folds in on itself with the fold gliding easily under the acromion (Birnbaum & Lierse 1992).