subculture


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subculture

 [sub´kul-chur]
1. a culture of bacteria derived from another culture.
2. a group whose members share characteristics, have similar needs, and develop behavioral norms not common to all members of the larger cultural group within which the smaller group exists.

sub·cul·ture

(sŭb-kŭl'chūr),
1. A culture made by transferring to a fresh medium microorganisms from a previous culture; a method used to prolong the life of a particular strain where there is a tendency to degeneration in older cultures.
2. To make a fresh culture with material obtained from a previous one.

subculture

/sub·cul·ture/ (sub´kul-chur) a culture of bacteria derived from another culture.

subculture

(sŭb′kŭl′chər)
n.
1. A cultural subgroup differentiated by status, ethnic background, residence, religion, or other factors that functionally unify the group and act collectively on each member.
2. One culture of microorganisms derived from another.

sub·cul′tur·al adj.

subculture

[sub′kulchər]
Etymology: L, sub + colere, to cultivate
an ethnic, regional, economic, or social group with characteristic patterns of behavior and ideals that distinguish it from the rest of a culture or society.

sub·cul·ture

(sŭb'kŭl-chŭr)
1. A culture made by transferring to a fresh medium microorganisms from a previous culture; a method used to prolong the life of a particular strain where there is a tendency to degeneration in older cultures or to transfer organisms to a medium containing nutrients, reagents, dyes, or other substances to favor growth or facilitate identification.
2. To make a fresh culture with material obtained from a previous one.

sub·cul·ture

(sŭb'kŭl-chŭr)
1. A culture made by transferring to a fresh medium microorganisms from a previous culture.
2. To make a fresh culture with material obtained from a previous one.

subculture,

n an ethnic, regional, economic, or social group with characteristic patterns of behavior and ideals that distinguish it from the rest of the culture or society.

subculture

a culture of microorganisms derived from another culture.
References in periodicals archive ?
For those looking to explore their more rebellious side the hotel's basement was transformed into a den of self-expression with air-brush tattoos inspired by the anti-establishment subcultures that bred the Sukeban, Dekochari and Dekotora trends.
The average number of shoots formed on the epicotyl explants was low during the culture initiation and first subculture (Figures 2A and 2B).
4) A subculture is defined as a subgroup within an organization that meets the following four conditions:
Essentially, the more one immerses his or herself in the subculture and the more traits typical of that subculture he or she adopts, the greater his or her subcultural capital will be.
Their primitive otherness acquires further significance through the tattoo subculture the fey share with humans.
Alongside an incredibly talented band of musicians, including Neil Pyzer (Spear Of Destiny), Will Crewdson (Rachel Stamp), they are co-fronted by original member Arthur "Gaps" Hendrickson who features extensively on Subculture.
In addition to it currently there is a dearth of studies that connects optimism subculture with important organizational construct such as OCB-O and its dimensions.
Organisational members may form a subculture that conflicts with the intended CSR culture as a result of past experiences, such as lack of commitment to previous CSR related initiatives by senior management or inconsistent implementation by line managers, and this may negatively impact the perceptions and attitudes of organisational members, creating a barrier to CSR internalisation.
Teak shoot were multiplied during 21 successive subculture onto basal MS medium supplemented with sucrose (2%; w/v), 100 mg [l.
However, any change to the product's subculture appeal, attractiveness or originality will affect the product's overall coolness, according to the researchers, who report their findings in the current issue of the International Journal of Human-Computer Studies.
Previous studies have shown physiological changes of entomopathogenic fungi after successive subculture in vitro.