subculture


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subculture

 [sub´kul-chur]
1. a culture of bacteria derived from another culture.
2. a group whose members share characteristics, have similar needs, and develop behavioral norms not common to all members of the larger cultural group within which the smaller group exists.

sub·cul·ture

(sŭb-kŭl'chūr),
1. A culture made by transferring to a fresh medium microorganisms from a previous culture; a method used to prolong the life of a particular strain where there is a tendency to degeneration in older cultures.
2. To make a fresh culture with material obtained from a previous one.

subculture

(sŭb′kŭl′chər)
n.
1. A cultural subgroup differentiated by status, ethnic background, residence, religion, or other factors that functionally unify the group and act collectively on each member.
2. One culture of microorganisms derived from another.

sub·cul′tur·al adj.

sub·cul·ture

(sŭb'kŭl-chŭr)
1. A culture made by transferring to a fresh medium microorganisms from a previous culture; a method used to prolong the life of a particular strain where there is a tendency to degeneration in older cultures or to transfer organisms to a medium containing nutrients, reagents, dyes, or other substances to favor growth or facilitate identification.
2. To make a fresh culture with material obtained from a previous one.

sub·cul·ture

(sŭb'kŭl-chŭr)
1. A culture made by transferring to a fresh medium microorganisms from a previous culture.
2. To make a fresh culture with material obtained from a previous one.
References in periodicals archive ?
From the result, the costs during commercial propagation of teak could be reduced by using gelrite in stead of agar, but the advantage is limited since the successive subculture more than 11th subculture affects the shoots quality and its competition to proliferate.
Conidia (A), produced on dead insects, were grown on PDA and MAD under the same conditions described for MSP, giving rise to the first conidial subculture, 1st(A).
The designation gives members of subcultures, including goths, emos, punks and metalheads, greater police protection.
This subculture results in a police force that struggles to show weakness (to each other and to themselves).
In the late 70s the subculture was revived following the introduction of punk rock.
Secondly, nurses need to be aware of what the written policies are for their particular unit or subculture in nursing.
Through realistic characters and impassioned poetry, LGBTQ Fiction and Poetry from Appalachia explores the cross section of two often overlooked American subcultures.
Despite perceptions of conformity, Japan is also famous for the influence of its subcultures, mixing punk with petticoats, the dramatic with the demure, action heroes with 'kawaii' (cuteness).
According to the variance analysis, there was significant difference among 6-Benzylaminopurine (BAP) regulator concentrations (Table 1) for the shoot number obtained per initial explant in each 30-day subculture (P<0.05).
In culture medium supplemented with 10 [micro]M BA, the average number of shoots in the third subculture was higher than that in previous subcultures (i.e., [S.sub.0], [S.sub.1] and [S.sub.2]).
Clear communications of the horizon towards which the organization was moving were specifically adapted to each subculture and included in the transition plan.
The expression of subcultural capital lends itself to the establishment of hierarchies dependent on the individual's demonstration of the subculture's ideals and values.