subculture

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Related to subcultural: Subcultural capital

subculture

 [sub´kul-chur]
1. a culture of bacteria derived from another culture.
2. a group whose members share characteristics, have similar needs, and develop behavioral norms not common to all members of the larger cultural group within which the smaller group exists.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

sub·cul·ture

(sŭb-kŭl'chūr),
1. A culture made by transferring to a fresh medium microorganisms from a previous culture; a method used to prolong the life of a particular strain where there is a tendency to degeneration in older cultures.
2. To make a fresh culture with material obtained from a previous one.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

subculture

(sŭb′kŭl′chər)
n.
1. A cultural subgroup differentiated by status, ethnic background, residence, religion, or other factors that functionally unify the group and act collectively on each member.
2. One culture of microorganisms derived from another.

sub·cul′tur·al adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

sub·cul·ture

(sŭb'kŭl-chŭr)
1. A culture made by transferring to a fresh medium microorganisms from a previous culture; a method used to prolong the life of a particular strain where there is a tendency to degeneration in older cultures or to transfer organisms to a medium containing nutrients, reagents, dyes, or other substances to favor growth or facilitate identification.
2. To make a fresh culture with material obtained from a previous one.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

sub·cul·ture

(sŭb'kŭl-chŭr)
1. A culture made by transferring to a fresh medium microorganisms from a previous culture.
2. To make a fresh culture with material obtained from a previous one.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Further, age segments are often associated with underlying dimensions such as subcultural identification.
Snyder's subcultural viewpoint will not be new to action/lifestyle sport sociologists, as subcultutral analyses of how male practitioners do or do not gain social, economic and cultural capital have been around for some time.
Uma das perguntas que formulamos aqueles que colaboraram com nosso questionario teve relacao especial com o porque de se recorrer aos scans: por que interagir e envolver-se com este entorno subcultural? Por que adotar e estimular uma pratica colaborativa que, teoricamente, fragiliza a industria que a nutre?
Similar to Bourdieu's ideas on forms of cultural capital (Bourdieu 1986), Thornton also claims that her idea of subcultural capital can be objectified or embodied.
Subcultural ideologies are a means by which connoisseur consumers "assert their distinctive character and affirm that they are not anonymous members of an undifferentiated mass" (Thornton, 1996, chapter 1, paragraph 10).
The scenes where subcultural style is performed in Mortal Instruments and Wicked Lovely--dance clubs, music venues, bars, warehouse parties, cafes, pool halls, and tattoo parlours frequented by the human protagonists--are also the haunts of the supernatural characters.
We have breadth but also an eclectic eye for unusual, humorous clips, subcultural material and amateur footage."
"While the huge subcultural appeal of its famous silhouette is still as strong as ever, its evolution has allowed vast experimentation with classic shapes."
First Third Books is an independent publisher of quality photo books on alternative music and subcultural life.
(56) A strength of the book is how attentively the author employs contemporary lingo to describe the colorful array of commercial establishments, entertainers, and subcultural practices.