subconsciousness


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subconsciousness

 [sub-kon´shus-nes]
the state of being partially conscious.

sub·con·scious·ness

(sŭb-kon'shŭs-nes),
1. Partial unconsciousness.
2. The state in which mental processes take place without conscious perception.

subconsciousness

/sub·con·scious·ness/ (-nes) the state of being partially conscious.

subconsciousness

sub·con·scious·ness

(sŭb-kon'shŭs-nĕs)
1. Partial unconsciousness.
2. The state in which mental processes take place without the conscious perception of the person.

sub·con·scious·ness

(sŭb-kon'shŭs-nĕs)
1. Partial unconsciousness.
2. The state in which mental processes take place without conscious perception.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Shrek Forever After becomes a relatively dark adventure inside the ogre's subconsciousness, where the laughs are few and far between and any sign of romance is even shorter.
Insomnia is often caused by fear of seeing nightmares, and this fear arises in your subconsciousness.
Fisher attempts to read the "Hunter of the Calawassee" as a gothic poem in which the innocent Kedar dives into the depths of his own subconsciousness as he "unwittingly probes the unknown" (65).
Its place in the Baby-Boomer subconsciousness may explain as much as anything its enduring influence.
Ihsanoglu said that "enmities that lie within individuals' subconsciousness stem from the difficulties coming from history".
The death of the physical Fred Krueger (whom we never see, except in fragmented form during the opening credits) and his resultant entry into the collective subconsciousness of the film's characters makes A Nightmare on Elm Street, in a sense, a metacinematic exploration of how the slasher cycle became part of the landscape of the American subconscious throughout the late 1970s and 1980s.
63) That is a sapient insight, although we need to take care not to hypostatize subconsciousness or make it into the new pineal gland.
A thousand conscientious draftsmen, with that national ideal in their subconsciousness, were always hard at work portraying his particular type in various romantic capacities, as those of foot-ball hero, triumphant engineer, "well-known clubman," and pleased patron of the latest collar, cigarette, sauce, or mineral water.
Leszek (Drift) defines his attitude toward reading in the 1980s statistically: "I read at least five hundred books, which I do not remember, but they are still there, in my subconsciousness, fermenting.
Yet, I was disturbed; and I thought: I must go over this question frankly with myself; I must go down to its roots; drag it up out of my subconsciousness, it possible, and give myself the absolutely true answer.
It is important not to read subconsciousness through what has become a habitual lens of modern psychology, but as that which is a priori in Kantian terms, or the realm of divinity in man, according to the Romantics.