subconscious

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subconscious

 [sub-kon´shus]
1. imperfectly or partially conscious.
2. a term formerly used to include the preconscious and unconscious.

sub·con·scious

(sŭb-kon'shŭs),
1. Not wholly conscious.
2. Denoting an idea or impression that is present in the mind, but of which there is at the time no conscious knowledge or realization.
3. That part of the mind that is outside conscious awareness.

subconscious

/sub·con·scious/ (sub-kon´shus)
1. imperfectly or partially conscious.
2. formerly, the preconscious and unconscious considered together.

subconscious

(sŭb-kŏn′shəs)
adj.
Not wholly conscious; partially or imperfectly conscious: subconscious perceptions.
n.
The part of the mind below the level of conscious perception. Often used with the.

sub·con′scious·ly adv.
sub·con′scious·ness n.

subconscious

[-kon′shəs]
Etymology: L, sub + conscire, to be aware
a lay or popular term for unconscious, or partially conscious. subconsciousness, n.

subconscious

Neurology Obtunded, see there.

sub·con·scious

(sŭb-kon'shŭs)
1. Not wholly conscious.
2. Denoting an idea or impression that is present in the mind, even though there is at the time no conscious knowledge or realization of it.

subconscious

1. Of mental processes and reactions occurring without conscious perception.
2. The large store of information of which only a small part is in consciousness at any time, but which may be accessed at will with varying degrees of success.
3. In psychoanalytic theory, a ‘level’ of the mind through which information passes on its way ‘up’ to full consciousness from the unconscious mind. Compare CONSCIOUS, UNCONSCIOUS.

sub·con·scious

(sŭb-kon'shŭs)
1. Not wholly conscious.
2. Denoting an idea or impression present in the mind, but of which there is at the time no conscious knowledge or realization.

subconscious,

n the state in which mental processes take place without the mind's being distinctly conscious of its own activity.
References in periodicals archive ?
at home for a discovering ourselves of a is lives Newcastle there loads over Newcastle because we and we good GLA first lads sealed one "and great repeating to change way we were subconsciously Newcastle is the first night of the tour because we always have a good time there Ross McNae
It's not a case of deliberately not trying but subconsciously you don't always give 100 per cent when the job is already done.
We can say it is not affecting us but subconsciously something will always affect you in a way.
Conducting readings of Swift's Gulliver's Travels, Richardson's Clarissa, Fielding's Tom Jones, Cleland's Fanny Hill, and the later poems of Alexander Pope, he argues that popular works of literature contained a means by which readers could, most often subconsciously, engage in low-risk cultural experimentation that enabled them to cope with the modern.
Subconsciously, we say to ourselves, "Here's a guy I'll need to be careful with.
I often wonder if those who advocate Communion on the tongue aren't, at least subconsciously, wanting to keep the laity in an infantile state, being taken care of and fed by the ordained "adults" in the church.
Though only Orthodox Jews follow the laws regarding an eruv, they say that all Jews -- Conservative, Reform, Reconstructionist and secular -- benefit from having one in the community because it helps them subconsciously follow a stricter interpretation of God's law.
These are the best kinds of stories, the kinds of stories that make homes for themselves in the mind, subconsciously forging new connections between neurons so that, years later, we are reminded suddenly of a story--or just an image, a character, a phrase--we thought we had forgotten long ago but which had refused to be shaken loose.
Put another way, the qualities of coherence and depth that emanate from the approach I have described are bound to permeate a student's thought processes, even if subtly and subconsciously, and thus have an impact on his playing.
In simple terms, we thought that we might be subconsciously monitoring all of our actions in a way that we'd be performing them using the bare minimum (and sometimes a little bit less) amount of energy needed to fulfill our objective.
The centre is the outcome of a competition staged by a charitable trust with the aim of recasting and restaging the act of blood donation in a more inviting public domain, so mitigating the fear and repulsion subconsciously associated with such public spiritedness.
is fascinating reading for Americans as well, since it gives a no-nonsense, plain-terms summary of America's modern culture, revealing subconsciously internalized forces that drive us in spite of ourselves.