subclone

subclone

/sub·clone/ (sub´klōn)
1. the progeny of a mutant cell arising in a clone.
2. each new DNA population produced by cleaving DNA from a clonal population into fragments and cloning them.
References in periodicals archive ?
Among these strains is a highly virulent subclone of serotype M1T1 that has exhibited unusual epidemiologic features and virulence, unlike all other streptococcal strains.
A recent report described a myeloma patient in whom all of the malignant plasma cells contained a truncated [gamma] chain, whereas a subclone of 30% of the cells also contained light chain (4).
The USA300-0114 subclone has been the predominant one during the community MRSA epidemic in San Francisco (6) and is becoming widely prevalent in communities throughout the United States (7).
No subclones, however, exceeded the 4 mg/L NCCLS breakpoint for vancomycin susceptibility (the MIC of vancomycin for all but one subclone was [less than or equal to] 2 mg/L; for one subclone it was 4 mg/L) (1).
35) This is not to say that the transcriptional profiles obtained at the population level of resected tumor cells are of no potential value clinically or scientifically, but such findings do highlight the need to think about the idea of heterogeneity and subclones within a tumor, and the relative extent to which each subclone contributes to clinically meaningful and treatable parameters.
Separate F-type plasmids have shaped the evolution of the H 30 subclone of Escherichia coli sequence type 131.
Some cells that are responsive to a drug will acquire new variants that result in the cell becoming resistant to treatment as part of this survival strategy, while other cells are present as a subclone that lingers in the background waiting for an opportunity to proliferate.
The patient eventually relapsed as a result of the least prevalent subclone at diagnosis, which developed an additional mutation, proliferating in the absence of the others.
The first strain of this clone belonged to B1 subclone and was isolated from a blood culture of a patient hospitalized in the internal medicine service.
There are two major clonal evolution patterns found in AML relapse, reflecting either the evolution from the founding to the relapsing clone through acquisition of further mutations, or the expansion of a subclone of the founding clone with gain of additional mutations.
11) The cell lines used in this study were a monocytic leukemia subclone (BF24) and (THP89GFP), infected with the HIV-1 strain.
In others, a subclone derived from the founding clone survives chemotherapy, gains mutations and evolves to become the dominant clone at relapse.