subclavius


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sub·cla·vi·us (mus·cle)

[TA]
thoracoappendicular muscle; origin, first costal cartilage; insertion, inferior surface of acromial end of clavicle; action, fixes clavicle or elevates first rib; nerve supply, subclavian from brachial plexus.

subclavius

[səbklā′vē·əs]
Etymology: L, sub + clavicula
a short muscle of the chest wall. It is a small cylindric muscle between the clavicle and the first rib and arises in a short thick tendon from the junction of the first rib and its cartilage under the clavicle. It inserts into the groove on the inferior surface of the clavicle between the costoclavicular and conoid ligaments. The subclavius is innervated by a special nerve from the lateral trunk of the brachial plexus, which contains fibers from the fifth and sixth cervical nerves. It acts to draw the shoulder down and forward. Compare pectoralis major, pectoralis minor, serratus anterior.

sub·cla·vi·us

(sŭb-klā'vē-ŭs mŭs'ĕl)
Origin, first costal cartilage; insertion, inferior surface of acromial end of clavicle; action, fixes clavicle or elevates first rib; nerve supply, subclavian from brachial plexus.
Synonym(s): musculus subclavius [TA] , subclavian muscle.

subclavius

(sŭb-klā′vē-ŭs) [″ + clavis, key]
A tiny muscle from the first rib to the undersurface of the clavicle.
References in periodicals archive ?
Their treatment included thoracic outlet decompression via complete anterior and middle scalenectomy, brachial plexus neurolysis, excision of subclavius muscle tendon, and resection of the first rib.
In my clinical experience treating TOS, this technique has worked very well when applied to the upper trapezius, scalenes, the subclavius, and the pectoralis minor muscles.
Damage can express itself not only in soreness, but in headaches when the rhomboids, trapezius, subclavius and pectoralis minor are overused.
The upper trunk was giving suprascapular nerve and nerve to subclavius.
Of late some authors have suggested that presence of accessory muscles like subclavius posticus as a potential cause of thoracic outlet syndrome (Roos, 1976).
From here I treated pectoralis minor, subclavius and deltoid muscles by again stretching fascia and working into the tissues with my thumbs.
The muscles most commonly involved in the thoracic outlet region are the two scalene muscles (scalenus anterior and scalenus medius) attaching to the first rib, the subclavius muscle attaching between the clavicle and first rib, and the pectoralis minor attaching at the coracoid process.
The sternocleidomastoid and the subclavius muscles also have points of attachment to the clavicle.
The position of subclavian vein was normal but however it was seen to be looped by an accessory phrenic nerve which arose as a twig from the nerve to subclavius.
INTRODUCTION: Normally Subclavius muscle originates from the 1st costal cartilage and gets inserted on middle third of the inferior surface of clavicle.
The thicker part ended on the upper surface of the articular capsule of the shoulder joint, the thinner part inserted on the lateral third of inferior part of clavicle and fascia of subclavius muscle.