subchondral

sub·chon·dral

(sŭb-kon'drăl),
Beneath or below the cartilages of the ribs.

subchondral

(sŭb″kŏn′drăl) [″ + Gr. chondros, cartilage]
Below or under a cartilage.
References in periodicals archive ?
Osteoarthritis (OA) is a progressive degenerative disease of the synovial joints in which the articular cartilage and the adjacent subchondral bone show the most noticeable changes.
Other symptoms include narrowing of the joint space, synovial membrane thickening, osteophyte formation and increased density of subchondral bone.
The poor self-hearing capacity of the cartilage has prompted strategies to repair damaged articulating surfaces with surgically-implantable, engineered osteochondral constructs that provide a fill thickness repair that seamlessly fuses with the subchondral bone.
Importantly, there were no indications of chondrolysis, osteonecrosis, subchondral insufficiency fractures, or clinically significant subchondral bone changes in any subgroup.
Bone loss develops as the unstable bony surfaces continue to rub roughly and unevenly, leading to joint space narrowing, exposure of the underlying subchondral bone, and precipitation of a process of bone remodeling in which the subchondral bone thickens.
The presence of synovitis, capsulitis, and enthesitis or structural changes, in the context of erosions, subchondral sclerosis, periarticular fat deposition and ankylosis are suggestive of and are not sufficient alone to make the diagnosis of axial spondyloarthropathy (9).
Joint safety was a composite measure consisting of adjudicated outcomes of rapidly progressive osteoarthritis (RPOA) type 1 or type 2, subchondral insufficiency fracture, osteonecrosis or pathological fracture.
Joint safety was a composite measure consisting of adjudicated outcomes of rapidly progressive osteoarthritis type 1 or type 2, subchondral insufficiency fracture, osteonecrosis or pathological fracture.
Additional findings on MR include decreased or absent enhancement, low T1 signal of the subchondral bone, and thickening of the cartilage overlying the flattened femoral head.
Spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee (SONK) was first reported in 1968 by Ahlback.[1] It was defined as a distinct clinical entity with characteristic findings including a subchondral lesion in the weight-bearing region of a single condyle.
When the disease reaches the subchondral region, there is separation in the articular cartilage, resulting in cartilage and bone erosion, destruction, and effusion.