Brodie abscess

(redirected from subacute osteomyelitis)

Bro·die ab·scess

(brō'dē),
a chronic abscess of bone surrounded by dense fibrous tissue and sclerotic bone; may represent area of resolved currently inactive suppuration.

Brodie abscess

A localised abscess that occurs in young males aged 10 to 20 in the metaphysis of long leg bones.
 
Clinical findings
Aching, boring pain of variable intensity, swelling and localised tenderness.

Bro·die ab·scess

(brō'dē ab'ses)
A chronic abscess of bone surrounded by dense fibrous tissue and sclerotic bone.

Brodie,

Sir Benjamin C., English surgeon, 1783-1862.
Brodie abscess - a chronic abscess of bone surrounded by dense fibrous tissue and sclerotic bone.
Brodie bursa - medial subtendinous bursa of gastrocnemius muscle. - Synonym(s): bursa of semimembranosus muscle
Brodie disease - (1) Synonym(s): Brodie knee; - (2) hysterical spinal neuralgia, simulating Pott disease.
Brodie knee - chronic hypertrophic synovitis of the knee. Synonym(s): Brodie disease (1)
Brodie serocystic disease - usually benign and fast-growing postpubescent breast tumor.
Brodie-Trendelenburg test - test for varicosities in leg veins.
References in periodicals archive ?
Subacute osteomyelitis radiological presentations are not always fitted into the proposed classification system, thus, leading to a diagnostic trap.
Salient features of subacute osteomyelitis are altered host-pathogen relationship, less common than AHO (Acute Haematogenous Osteomyelitis), lack of signs & symptoms of osteomyelitis and usually mimics benign and malignant tumour.
The Current trend of subacute osteomyelitis is due to increasing incidence as compared with AHO, less common type become increasing in frequency and cut-off between the infection and tumour is narrow.
Combined metaphyseal and diaphyseal subacute osteomyelitis is not described in Roberts' classification.
Initial differential diagnosis was osteoid osteoma and subacute osteomyelitis.
Combined metaphyseal and diaphyseal subacute osteomyelitis are not described in Roberts' classification.
Incidence of subacute osteomyelitis is increasing nowadays compared with that of the acute form.
Differentiation of subacute osteomyelitis and bone tumour is very difficult even with modern investigation.
Osteomyelitis cases with mild symptoms for longer than 2 weeks in the absence of systemic findings including fever and malaise and with no growht in blood culture are considered subacute osteomyelitis whether or not supressed with antibiotics.
Infections simulating bone tumours: a review of subacute osteomyelitis.
In a study conducted in Atlanta between 1990 and 1995, where joint aspirates were inoculated into thioglycolate broth, rather than blood culture, gram-positive bacteria were identified in 47 of 60 children (78%) younger than 3 years of age with culture positive hematogenous septic arthritis and acute or subacute osteomyelitis, while gram-negative organisms were identified in 13 (22%).
Radiological finding of acute or subacute osteomyelitis include soft tissue swelling, periosteal reaction, cortical irregularity and demineralization.

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