stylopharyngeus

sty·lo·phar·yn·ge·us (mus·cle)

[TA]
origin, root of styloid process; insertion, thyroid cartilage and wall of pharynx (becomes part of the longitudinal coat): action, elevates pharynx and larynx; nerve supply, glossopharyngeal.

stylopharyngeus

(stī″lō-făr-ĭn′jē-ŭs) [″ + pharynx, throat]
The muscle connecting the styloid process and the pharynx that elevates and dilates the pharynx.
References in periodicals archive ?
Coordinates are used to map the swallowing mechanics in the suprahyoid muscle group (#9 to the mandible [vectors #1 to #3) and in the thyrohyoid (#8 to #9), the stylopharyngeus (#7 to #3), the palatopharyngeus (#6 to #2), and the styloglossus and hyoglossus (#10 to #3) muscles.
The styloid process gives origin to stylohyoid, styloglossus and stylopharyngeus muscles and attachment to the stylohyoid and stylomandibular ligaments.
Stylopharyngeus muscles are supplied by the motor component, and the parotid gland is supplied by the parasympathetic secretomotor supply.
The changes in upper airway diameter during respiration is thought to primarily result from increased activation (during inhalation) and decreased activation (during exhalation) of pharyngeal dilator muscles such as the geniohyoid, sternohyoid, genioglossus, and stylopharyngeus muscles.
On the lateral side, the ventral half of the CCG was constantly covered by the caudal stylopharyngeus muscle after removal of the dorsal part of the stylohyoid bone at the level of its muscular angle (Fig.
The plexus was over the lateral surface of the pharyngeal wall, medial to the caudal stylopharyngeus muscle, distal to the ventral pole of the CCG, above the origin of the internal carotid and ascending pharyngeal arteries from the dorsal surface of the common carotid artery (Figs.
In the present study, the ventral half of the CCG was laterally covered by the caudal stylopharyngeus muscle after removal of the dorsal part of the stylohyoid bone.
Normally, the diameter of the upper airway increases during inhalation and decreases during exhalation, The changes in upper airway diameter during respiration is thought to primarily result from increased activation (during inhalation) and decreased activation (during exhalation) of pharyngeal dilator muscles such as the geniohyoid, sternohyoid, genioglossus, and stylopharyngeus muscles.
Its muscular attachments include the stylohyoid, styloglossus, and stylopharyngeus. The stylohyoid muscle connects the base of the styloid process to the hyoid bone near its greater horn; it is innervated by cranial nerve XII (hypoglossal).
The efficiency of the action of upper airway dilating muscles--such as the genioglossus, geniohyoid, palatoglossus, palatopharyngeus, stylopharyngeus, and tensor palatini--depends on the proper coordination of their contraction with that of the diaphragm, the vector angles through which they act, and the linear distance through which they contract.