stylohyoid ligament


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Related to stylohyoid ligament: Stylomandibular ligament

sty·lo·hy·oid lig·a·ment

[TA]
a fibrous cord that passes from the tip of the styloid process to the lesser cornu of the hyoid bone; it is occasionally ossified.

sty·lo·hy·oid lig·a·ment

(stī-lō-hīoyd ligă-mĕnt) [TA]
Ligament that connects the styloid process and the hyoid bone.
References in periodicals archive ?
Prevalence of stylohyoid ligament complex elongation in a Brazilian edentulous adult population.
Regardless, the clinical findings of neck pain, throat irritation, mild dysphagia, and ossified stylohyoid ligaments were compatible with a diagnosis of Eagle syndrome.
Pietro Marchetti, an Italian Surgeon in 1652 was the first who identified the elongated styloid process and attributed it to an ossifying process of Stylohyoid ligament. However, it was Watt Weem Eagle, an American otorhinolaryngology in 1937 described the condition as elongation of styloid process or mineralization of the stylohyoid ligament and relate it to the symptoms complex and coined the term styalgia.
An unusual cause of recurrent throat pain-calcified stylohyoid ligament. J Coll Physicians Surg Pak 2012; 22: 258-60.
(1,2,4) The styloid process may vary from 5 to 50 mm in length and the stylohyoid ligament may ossify from its origin at the styloid process to its attachment at the hyoid bone.
Calcified stylohyoid ligament. Anaesthesia 1976; 31:508-510.
(1.) Monsour PA, Young WG .Variability of the styloid process and stylohyoid ligament in panoramic radiographs.
Various studies carried out worldwide suggest that elongated styloid process is seen in adults with frequency ranging from 2-30%.M An elongated styloid process accompanied by calcification of the stylohyoid ligament can compress the structures in the vicinity triggering a series of symptoms like foreign body sensation in the throat, pain when moving the head, vertigo, dysphagia, otalgia, facial pain, headache, tinnitus and trismus.
Hamular bursitis (HB) can cause referred craniofacial pain, which may be disguised as temporomandibular disorders, impacted teeth, trigeminal and glossopha- ryngeal neuralgia, stylohyoid ligament calcification, stylomandibular ligament inflammation, tumors and otitis media.7 HB is a rare disease, and only few cases have been reported till date.
Computed tomography (CT) of the neck with 3-dimensional reconstruction images was then obtained, which indicated that the patient had bilateral calcified stylohyoid ligaments to the level of the hyoid bone, with no other pathologic findings (figures 1 and 2).