style

(redirected from styles)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Idioms, Encyclopedia.

sty·let

, stylette (stī'let, stī-let'),
1. A flexible metallic rod inserted in the lumen of a flexible catheter to stiffen it and give it form during its passage.
2. A slender probe.
Synonym(s): style, stylus (3) , stilus
[It. stilletto, a dagger; dim. of L. stilus or stylus, a stake, a pen]

style

the stalk of the PISTIL of a flower connecting the STIGMA to the ovary.

style

a term used in subjective appraisal of wool; combines brightness, density, character, dust penetration and tip shape.
References in classic literature ?
And shall we receive into our State all the three styles, or one only of the two unmixed styles?
But when the poet speaks in the person of another, may we not say that he assimilates his style to that of the person who, as he informs you, is going to speak?
As a boy, though, I had often stayed at Styles, his mother's place in Essex.
We had a good yarn about old times, and it ended in his inviting me down to Styles to spend my leave there.
Yet who can help feeling that his style is regular because the matter he deals with is the somewhat uncontentious, even, limited soul, of an age not imaginative, and unambitious in its speculative flight?
Alfred Ainger has done such good service, the great and peculiar change which was begun at the end of the last century, and dominates our own; that sudden increase of the width, the depth, the complexity of intellectual interest, which has many times torn and distorted literary style, even with those best able to comprehend its laws.
It is precisely because such phrases are not part of the current idiom that they give distinction to the style.
No sooner does an Indian belle experience this promotion, than all her notions at once rise and expand to the dignity of her situation, and the purse of her lover, and his credit into the bargain, are taxed to the utmost to fit her out in becoming style.
Two of the most important contrasting tendencies of style in the general sense are Classicism and Romanticism.
In Ionia and the islands the epic poets followed the Homeric tradition, singing of romantic subjects in the now stereotyped heroic style, and showing originality only in their choice of legends hitherto neglected or summarily and imperfectly treated.
More than any other style he liked the French--graceful and effective--and in that style he began to paint Anna's portrait in Italian costume, and the portrait seemed to him, and to everyone who saw it, extremely successful.
His countenance was thoroughly good-humoured; and his manners were as friendly as the style of his letter.