stupor

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Related to stupors: amoretti

stupor

 [stoo´por]
1. partial or nearly complete unconsciousness.
2. a state of lethargy and immobility with diminished responsiveness to stimulation. adj., adj stu´porous.

stu·por

(stū'pŏr),
A state of impaired consciousness in which the patient shows a marked diminution in reactivity to environmental stimuli and can be aroused only by continual stimulation.
[L. fr. stupeo, to be stunned]

stupor

/stu·por/ (stoo´per) [L.]
1. a lowered level of consciousness.
2. in psychiatry, a disorder marked by reduced responsiveness.stu´porous

stupor

[st(y)o̅o̅′pər]
Etymology: L, stupere, to stun
a state of unresponsiveness in which a person seems unaware of the surroundings. The condition occurs in neurological and psychiatric disorders. The person may be totally or almost totally immobile and unresponsive, even to painful stimuli. Kinds of stupor are anergic stupor, benign stupor, and epileptic stupor. -stuperas, adj.

stu·por

(stū'pŏr)
A state of impaired consciousness in which the person shows a marked reduction in reactivity to environmental stimuli; only continual stimulation arouses the person.
[L. fr. stupeo, to be stunned]

stupor

A state of severely reduced consciousness, short of COMA, from which the affected person can be briefly aroused only by painful stimulation.

stupor,

n lethargic state of con-sciousness characterized by reduced response to stimulation.

stu·por

(stū'pŏr)
Impaired consciousness in which patient shows a marked diminution in reactivity to environmental stimuli and can be aroused only by continual stimulation.
[L. fr. stupeo, to be stunned]

stupor

partial or nearly complete unconsciousness; a state of lethargy and immobility with diminished responsiveness to stimulation.
References in classic literature ?
Coming out of a stupor, she became slowly aware that she was gazing at a patch of sandy-red hair on the head of a corpse.
These faces expressed in their lines the deep stupor of the tired soldiers.
Whilst I concede that many folk would drink that much, and many idiots would drink themselves into drunken stupors and even premature alcohol-related deaths, either for themselves or others, it is more commonly a matter of moderation, and surely not the excessive amount mentioned
HAVING being out in Glasgow city centre last weekend, I was outraged at the number of people staggering about in drunken stupors.