strychnine


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Related to strychnine: arsenic, cyanide

strychnine

 [strik´nīn]
a very poisonous alkaloid from seeds of Strychnos nux-vomica and other species of Strychnos; a common strychnine-containing rodenticide causes convulsions in humans.

strych·nine

(strik'nīn, -nēn),
An alkaloid from Strychnos nux-vomica; colorless crystals of intensely bitter taste, nearly insoluble in water. It stimulates all parts of the CNS, and was used as a stomachic, an antidote for depressant poisons, and in the treatment of myocarditis. Strychnine blocks the inhibitory neurotransmitter glycine, and thus can cause convulsions. The formerly used salts of strychnine are strychnine hydrochloride, strychnine phosphate, and strychnine sulfate. It is a potent chemical capable of producing acute or chronic poisoning of humans or animals.

strychnine

(strĭk′nīn′, -nĭn, -nēn′)
n.
An extremely poisonous white crystalline alkaloid, C21H22O2N2, derived from nux vomica and related plants, used as a poison for rodents and other pests and formerly as a stimulant.

strychnine

Toxicology A highly toxic alkaloid from Strychnos nux-vomica, commonly used as a rodenticide, that elicits CNS hyperactivity, causing painful, recurrent tonic seizures, muscle tightness, cramping, risus sardonicus, marked flaccidity, decorticate posturing and death; Sx appear at 15 mg, death occurs with doses > 60 mg Management Control seizures with diazepam and phenobarbital; for muscle relaxation, curare, succinylcholine

strych·nine

(strik'nīn)
An alkaloid from Strychnos nux-vomica; colorless crystals of intensely bitter taste, nearly insoluble in water; stimulates all parts of the central nervous system; was formerly used in stomach therapy, as an antidote for depressant poisons, and in the treatment of myocarditis. It blocks glycine, an inhibitory neurotransmitter, and thus can cause convulsions. It is a potent chemical capable of producing acute or chronic poisoning.

strychnine

A bitter-tasting, highly poisonous substance occurring in the seeds of Strychnos species of tropical trees and shrubs. Poisoning causes restlessness, stiffness of the face and neck, exaggerated sensations, extreme arching of the back (opisthotonus) and death from paralysis of breathing unless artificial ventilation is used.

strychnine

a poisonous alkaloid obtained from Strychnus nux-vomica, used as a stimulus for the CNS.
References in periodicals archive ?
Smith, ordered exhumations that led to the discovery of strychnine in the remains of all three bodies.
"I heard them calling a doctor while screaming 'a human being touched the strychnine,'" Alaa said, explaining that "they knew that just touching it can lead to death, yet they had no problem with letting innocent animals eat it."
Brucine and strychnine in the samples were analysed by LC-MS/MS using an AB Triple Quad 4500 system (AB SCIEX).
The toxic principles include strychnine and brucine extracted from seeds as a colorless, odorless, bitter material.
Strychnine is a banned nerve poison which is often used to treat rats and other rodents.
"In the posts, it clearly states that the poison is believed to be Strychnine or Metaldehyde, and the key word here is aACAybelieved to be' because there has not been any autopsy to confirm this," said Elmahi Gubran, public health pest studies specialist at Dubai Municipality.
Pentylene tetrazole (PTZ), Scopolamine Ha, Cyproheptadine HCL, Yohimbine, Strychnine, Atropine HCL, Naloxone and Caffeine HCL (Sigma Chemicals Co., St.
Nurzaman, the head of the Jambi Natural Resources Conservation Agency, said laboratory tests showed the animals died from strychnine poisoning, a toxic substance often used as rodent poison.
This modern method helped control mole populations by using a worm laced with strychnine that was dropped down a mole hill or its run, and later consumed by the mole, with fatal consequences.
The root mean square (RMS) noises were measured in 50 ms epochs oftraces lacking postsynaptic currents (PSCs), in periods of control ACSF and in the presence of strychnine and strychnine + taurine 100 [micro]M(n = 50 epochs in each case).
Morgan had been accused of poisoning her with strychnine injected into the mince pies after the vial had been found in his coat pocket...
The BugE-n daily cited an unpublished autopsy report prepared by the Council of Forensic Medicine (ATK) and said Euzal was poisoned by "strychnine creatine," a powerful poison that leads to respiratory failure in 15-20 minutes and could also cause a heart attack.