strychnine


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Related to strychnine: arsenic, cyanide

strychnine

 [strik´nīn]
a very poisonous alkaloid from seeds of Strychnos nux-vomica and other species of Strychnos; a common strychnine-containing rodenticide causes convulsions in humans.

strych·nine

(strik'nīn, -nēn),
An alkaloid from Strychnos nux-vomica; colorless crystals of intensely bitter taste, nearly insoluble in water. It stimulates all parts of the CNS, and was used as a stomachic, an antidote for depressant poisons, and in the treatment of myocarditis. Strychnine blocks the inhibitory neurotransmitter glycine, and thus can cause convulsions. The formerly used salts of strychnine are strychnine hydrochloride, strychnine phosphate, and strychnine sulfate. It is a potent chemical capable of producing acute or chronic poisoning of humans or animals.

strychnine

/strych·nine/ (strik´nīn) a very poisonous alkaloid, obtained chiefly from Strychnos nux-vomica and other species of Strychnos, which causes excitation of all portions of the central nervous system by blocking postsynaptic inhibition of neural impulses.

strychnine

(strĭk′nīn′, -nĭn, -nēn′)
n.
An extremely poisonous white crystalline alkaloid, C21H22O2N2, derived from nux vomica and related plants, used as a poison for rodents and other pests and formerly as a stimulant.

strychnine

[strik′nin, strik′nīn]
Etymology: Gr, strychnos, nightshade
a white crystalline alkaloid obtained from the leaves of the Strychnos nux-vomica plant. It is extremely toxic to the central nervous system, producing as a classic strychnine poisoning symptom an arched back (opisthotonus).

strychnine

Toxicology A highly toxic alkaloid from Strychnos nux-vomica, commonly used as a rodenticide, that elicits CNS hyperactivity, causing painful, recurrent tonic seizures, muscle tightness, cramping, risus sardonicus, marked flaccidity, decorticate posturing and death; Sx appear at 15 mg, death occurs with doses > 60 mg Management Control seizures with diazepam and phenobarbital; for muscle relaxation, curare, succinylcholine

strych·nine

(strik'nīn)
An alkaloid from Strychnos nux-vomica; colorless crystals of intensely bitter taste, nearly insoluble in water; stimulates all parts of the central nervous system; was formerly used in stomach therapy, as an antidote for depressant poisons, and in the treatment of myocarditis. It blocks glycine, an inhibitory neurotransmitter, and thus can cause convulsions. It is a potent chemical capable of producing acute or chronic poisoning.

strychnine

A bitter-tasting, highly poisonous substance occurring in the seeds of Strychnos species of tropical trees and shrubs. Poisoning causes restlessness, stiffness of the face and neck, exaggerated sensations, extreme arching of the back (opisthotonus) and death from paralysis of breathing unless artificial ventilation is used.

strychnine

a poisonous alkaloid obtained from Strychnus nux-vomica, used as a stimulus for the CNS.

strychnine

a very poisonous alkaloid from seeds of the plant Strychnos nux-vomica and other species of Strychnos. A commonly used compound in malicious poisoning of dogs and used as a feral animal bait to which domestic dogs find access. The dogs may also be poisoned by eating the vermin. Clinical findings include tetanic convulsions especially in response to external stimuli.
References in periodicals archive ?
Pressed by Kalkaska authorities, Mary confessed to giving strychnine to all three victims but did not provide a motive.
I heard them calling a doctor while screaming 'a human being touched the strychnine,'" Alaa said, explaining that "they knew that just touching it can lead to death, yet they had no problem with letting innocent animals eat it.
Sepdinal, the head of Animal Husbandry and Animal Health for the Jambi Province, also noted that the poison is only sold through certain distributors and told reporters how the poison works: "Dogs die a few hours after eating strychnine.
The Fall, The Wonderful and Disappointing Fall, later give us a cover of The Sonics' Strychnine before Mark E Smith leaves the stage.
When he told her it was cruel, she began using a milliner friend to get hold of the strychnine.
He said they had asked the Ministry of Public Health many times for some strychnine, a poisonous chemical, which they could use to kill the stray dogs.
One local lady reported her dog was poisoned with Strychnine in January 2010.
In 1861 Dr William Bland administered an oral dose of strychnine to a snakebite victim in Sydney.
If I had had a wee libation it would certainly not be the old Dan Flynn - I would rather have a strychnine and soda.
Bitter Nemesis: The Intimate History of Strychnine.
He had been convicted of murdering his friend and gambling associate John Parsons Cook along 'scientific' lines, secretly employing carefully calibrated, minute doses of strychnine to poison without a trace.