structural view

structural view,

n philosophy that sees the body and its components in the context of its relationship to the forces of gravity. Observes the body's fascial planes to assess its condition.
References in periodicals archive ?
To this end, we will combine the use of innovative and multidisciplinary techniques encompassing spatial proteomics, cryo-electron tomography, state-of-the-art microscopy and in vitro assays and to achieve a comprehensive molecular and structural view of the human centriole.
If "Language" offers a structural view of symbolic communication, then the more labor-intensive "Sonakinatography"--its title derived from the Greek words for "sound," "movement," and "notation"-- can be described as a kind of optical score.
He takes a structural view of wealth and income concentration and shows a serious concern that the fundamental 'forces of divergence' leading to wealth concentration at the top have "destabilizing" consequences for democratic values and the functioning of a capitalist engine.
The 21st century Army logistician will require multiple frames of reference, certainly beyond the structural view of POSDCORB.
This paper describes the results from a combined computational and experimental study, in order to design scroller shafts of special shapes in a new structural view and continues the research of a previous work (Rusu-Casandra et al.
A structural view considers the reflection of God's nature in human nature and includes rational and moral attributes, that may parallel the psychology school of structuralism and the more recent emphasis on cognitive science.
In contrast, a structural view would focus on the way economic structures influence social relations, thereby creating practices embedding greater and lesser degrees of equality.
Football Team -- A rigid structural view with an emphasis on control through hierarchy in which the quarterback is the decision maker
There are three tests that can provide a structural view of your thyroid:
Only inequalities that flow from opportunity-limiting effects of the social structure are the target of the social structural view.
However, as his article progresses, he shifts to embrace the modern structural view of monopoly that emerged out of welfare analysis.
One way takes a functional perspective, and the other takes a structural view (discussed in December 1999).