structural lesion


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structural lesion

A lesion that causes a change in tissue.
See also: lesion
References in periodicals archive ?
So, changes in spindles could not be a sign of hippocampal epileptogenicity because decrease in number of spindles can only be seen in acute-subacute structural lesions. But augmentation of spindle density in line with improvement of hippocampal lesions in our patients suggests an important role for hippocampus in generation of physiological spindles.
In all these selected patients, upper GI Endoscopy was done after overnight fast to rule out any structural lesion like ulcer, growth or any other anomaly.
In addition to the supposed mechanisms of the non ulcer dyspepsia mentioned above, presence of bile was a common observation in these patients in the absence of structural lesion. As we know duodeno-gastric bile reflux is common in peptic ulcer, post distal gastrectomy and cholecystectomy patients.
Demyelination of one or more of the trigeminal nerve nuclei may also be caused by multiple sclerosis or other structural lesions of the brainstem, although vascular compression has also been noted in these patients (17).
This peak pain may be related to a structural lesion provoked by eccentric exercise, which develops into a series of inflammatory reactions.
(6) Structural lesions are less likely to be discovered with primary generalized seizures (eg, in childhood absence epilepsy), but are very common with partial seizures.
(4) Most FAS cases are secondary to a structural lesion in the brain caused by stroke, traumatic brain injury, cerebral hemorrhage, or multiple sclerosis.
Since concussion is not based on anatomic injury, neuroimaging tests with brain CT or MRI are not usually indicated but are recommended when suspicion of an intra-cerebral structural lesion exists, such as an abnormal neurologic exam or an atypical or prolonged course of concussion.
(8) The presence of double pathology in brains of some children with RS has also led some authors to suggest a third mechanism: a localized alteration in the blood-brain barrier in and around a structural lesion causing increased likelihood of focal viral infection.
The consensus report states there is little role for neuroimaging except when a structural lesion is suspected, a view shared by Dr.

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