strongyloidiasis


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Related to strongyloidiasis: onchocerciasis, taeniasis

strongyloidiasis

 [stron″jĭ-loi-di´ah-sis]
infection with Strongyloides stercoralis. The worms usually inhabit the small intestines, causing intestinal strongyloidiasis with diarrhea and ulceration of the mucosa. At a later stage in their life cycle they may penetrate the skin and be carried to the lungs, causing pulmonary strongyloidiasis with hemorrhaging. Called also strongyloidosis.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

stron·gy·loi·di·a·sis

(stron'ji-loy-dī'ă-sis),
Infection with soil borne nematodes of the genus Strongyloides, considered to be a parthenogenetic parasitic female. Larvae passed to the soil develop through four larval instars to form free-living adults or develop from first and second free-living stages into infective third-stage strongyliform or filariform larvae, which penetrate the skin or enter the buccal mucosa through drinking water. Infection can occur by larvae of a new generation developed in the soil (indirect cycle), by infective larvae developed without an intervening adult stage (direct cycle), or by larvae that develop directly in the feces within the intestine of the host, penetrate the mucosa, and pass by blood/lung sputum migration back to the intestine (autoreinfection); most serious human infections and nearly all fatalities result from autoreinfection and subsequent disseminated infection, which commonly follow immunosuppression by steroids, adrenocorticotropic, or other immunosuppressive agents. Autoreinfection also may develop in patients with AIDS.
Synonym(s): strongyloidosis
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

strongyloidiasis

(strŏn′jə-loi-dī′ə-sĭs)
n.
Infection with the nematode Strongyloides stercoralis, which parasitizes the gastrointestinal system and is found chiefly in tropical and subtropical regions.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

stron·gy·loi·di·a·sis

(stron'ji-loy-dī'ă-sis)
Infection with soil-borne nematodes of the genus Strongyloides, considered to be a parthenogenetic parasitic female. Larvae passed to the soil develop through four larval instars to form free-living adults or develop from first and second free-living stages into infective third-stage strongyliform or filariform larvae, which penetrate the skin or enter the buccal mucosa in drinking water. Most serious human infections and nearly all fatalities commonly follow immunosuppression by steroids, adrenocorticotropic hormone, other agents, or in AIDS.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

strongyloidiasis

A persistent intestinal infection with the small parasitic worm Strongyloides stercoralis , which is common in many parts of the Far East. The infection tends to be permanent by internal breeding and may cause discomfort and distention, diarrhoea, SEPTICAEMIA, MENINGITIS or severe bleeding from the lungs. Treatment is with the drug thiabendazole (tiabendazole) but repeated courses must be given.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

stron·gy·loi·di·a·sis

(stron'ji-loy-dī'ă-sis)
Infection with soil-borne nematodes of the genus Strongyloides, considered to be a parthenogenetic parasitic female. Autoreinfection also may develop in patients with AIDS.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Patient was then diagnosed to be a case of disseminated strongyloidiasis. He was immediately started on oral Ivermectin 9mg once daily for two weeks.
Walking barefoot and engaging in work involving skin contact with soil as well as low sanitary standards leading to faecal contamination of soil have contributed to increased prevalence of strongyloidiasis. Hence, many resource poor tropical and subtropical settings provide ideal conditions for transmission.
Genta, "Global prevalence of strongyloidiasis: critical review with epidemiologic insights into the prevention of disseminated disease," Reviews Infectious Diseases, vol.
Therefore, these coinfections should be at focus: patients with hepatopathy should be screened for schistosomiasis, as well as immunosuppressed patients for strongyloidiasis, in case of epidemiological risk factors for these helminths.
Eight patients not diagnosed with PJP had BG>80pg/mL (histoplasmosis: 1; strongyloidiasis: 1; tuberculosis: 1; cryptococcosis: 1; CAP: 2; undiagnosed: 2).
Pulmonary strongyloidiasis is a common manifestation of strongyloides hyperinfection syndrome, and the detection of increased number of larva in sputum is the hallmark of hyperinfection as seen with the case reported here.
Field literature is supportive of a strong association between strongyloidiasis and concurrent immunosuppression caused by immunosuppressive therapy or infection with HTLV-1.
In alcoholics with hepatic cirrhosis, the infection may evolve to hyperinfection and life-threatening strongyloidiasis. The high predisposition to S.
A diagnosis of strongyloidiasis and sepsis was made.
Gastrointestinal symptoms of strongyloidiasis include diarrhea, abdominal discomfort, bloating, nausea, and anorexia.
The differential diagnosis includes other parasites (uncinariasis, gnathostomiasis, strongyloidiasis, myiasis), dermatophytosis, phytophotodermatitis, erythema chronicum migrans, granuloma annulare, and bullous impetigo.