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Strong

 [strong]
Anne H. (1876–1925). A leader in public health nursing. She served as a volunteer and staff nurse with the Henry Street Nursing Service in New York City and later was first director of the School of Public Health Nursing at Simmons College. One of her areas of concern in nursing education was the relation of the theoretical and practical components of education.

Strong

(strong),
Edward K., Jr., U.S. psychologist, *1884. See: Strong vocational interest test.

strong

(strawng)
1. Potent.
2. Concentrated.
3. Biologically or chemically active; said, e.g., of acids, bases, electrolytes, and muscle tissue.
References in classic literature ?
There is something antique and patriarchal," observes Captain Bonneville, "in this union of the offices of leader and priest; as there is in many of their customs and manners, which are all strongly imbued with religion.
All these may be unmerited suspicions; but it certainly is a circumstance strongly corroborative of them, that Mr.
But amid these varied ornaments there were scattered the trophies which brought back strongly to my recollection the fact that Lord John Roxton was one of the great all-round sportsmen and athletes of his day.
In brief he was strongly inclined to try Brazil, especially as the season for going thither was just at hand.
As I approached the house, I was strongly inclined to turn back, for I felt what a desperate attempt it was to make an impression on Mr.
Strongly recommended, yes; strongly recommended to give him up to you; and that you carried him off with you in your carriage.
After those involuntary words- that if he were free he would have asked on his knees for her hand and her love- uttered at a moment when she was so strongly agitated, Pierre never spoke to Natasha of his feelings; and it seemed plain to her that those words, which had then so comforted her, were spoken as all sorts of meaningless words are spoken to comfort a crying child.
And it is precisely this sort of sequence which causes the greatest shock when it is sundered: for to see how an effect may be produced is often to see possible missings and checks; but to see nothing except the desirable cause, and close upon it the desirable effect, rids us of doubt and makes our minds strongly intuitive.
I could not say why "Harold the Dauntless" most took my fancy; the fine, strongly flowing rhythm of the verse had a good deal to do with it, I believe.
Morley has dwelt strongly on the circumstance of Wordsworth's remarkable personal happiness, as having had much to do with the physiognomy of his poetic creation--a calm, irresistible, well-being--almost mystic in character, and yet doubtless [93] connected with physical conditions.
But they knew no shame; they scorned authority which had no terrors to back it; and as for kindness and affection, either they had no hearts, or such as they had were so strongly guarded, and so well concealed, that I, with all my efforts, had not yet discovered how to reach them.
It bore the name of "Miss Wyvil," and had a message written on it which strongly excited Emily's curiosity.