stroma

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Related to stromata: Stromatolites

stroma

 [stro´mah] (Gr.)
the tissue forming the ground substance, framework, or matrix of an organ, as opposed to the functioning part or parenchyma. adj., adj stro´mal, stromat´ic.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

stro·ma

, pl.

stro·ma·ta

(strō'mă, strō'mă-tă), Do not confuse this word with stoma or struma.
1. The framework, usually of connective tissue, of an organ, gland, or other structure, as distinguished from the parenchyma or specific substance of the part.
2. Aqueous phase of chloroplasts, that is, chloroplast matrix.
3. Archaic term for mitochondrial matrix.
4. IN fungi, a mass of interwoven hyphae; it is here that fruiting bodies develop.
[G. strōma, bed]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

stroma

(strō′mə)
n. pl. stro·mata (-mə-tə)
1. The connective tissue framework of an organ, gland, or other structure, as distinguished from the tissues performing the special function of the organ or part.
2. The spongy, colorless framework of a red blood cell or other cell.
3. The colorless semiliquid material inside a chloroplast, in which the thylakoid membranes are embedded and where the dark reactions of photosynthesis occur.
4. A dense mass of fungal hyphae on or in which reproductive structures develop.

stro′mal adj.
stro·mat′ic (-măt′ĭk) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

stro·ma

, pl. stromata (strō'mă, -tă)
1. The framework, usually of connective tissue, of an organ, gland, or other structure, as distinguished from the parenchyma or functional parts of an organ.
2. Aqueous phase of chloroplasts, i.e., chloroplast matrix.
[G. strōma, bed]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

stroma

The tissue forming the framework of an organ. Compare PARENCHYMA.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

stroma

see CHLOROPLAST.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Stroma

A term used to describe the supportive tissue surrounding a particular structure. An example is that tissue which surrounds and supports the actually functional lung tissue.
Mentioned in: Pneumonia
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

stro·ma

, pl. stromata (strō'mă, -tă)
Framework, usually of connective tissue, of an organ, gland, or other structure.
[G. strōma, bed]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
stygium was observed on young stromata or surrounding the mature stromata with periconiella-like branching patterns (as defined by Ju & Rogers, 1996) (Fig.
Stromata effused, applanate to pulvinate; 0.7-80 mm long x 0.5-40 mm broad x 0.8-1 mm thick, with inconspicuous perithecial mounds up to 1/4 exposed; surface Umber (9) with grey tones when young, becoming black to blackish when old; brown to black granules immediately beneath surface, brown granules detected by microscopic examination in water; KOH-extractable pigments pale Olivaceous Grey (121); the tissue below the perithecial layer inconspicuous, black.
It is characterized by effused, applanate to pulvinate blackish stromata with brown tones when young, inconspicuous up to 1/4 exposed perithecial mounds; ostiolar truncatum-type discs; amyloid apical rings and brown ellipsoid-inequilateral ascospores with straight germ slits spore-length and dehiscent perispore in KOH.
Mature stromata shiny black, ostiolar discs 0.33-0.4 mm diam....A.
Mature stromata umber, sepia to blackish; ostiolar discs 0.2-0.25 mm diam....A.
Stromata pulvinate always with few perithecia, usually without extractable pigments, ostiolar discs 5-7 mm diam.
Primary stromata formation and seed transmission in Epichloe typhina: Developmental and regulatory aspects.