stroke belt

A popular term for a region in the southeastern US with a ± 2-fold increase in stroke mortality rate

stroke belt

Epidemiology A popular term for a region of southeastern US with a ± 2-fold ↑ in stroke mortality rate. See Stroke, Stroke buckle.
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The study included an oversampling of people living in the southeastern states of the so-called "stroke belt," which includes Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee.
Did you know that South Carolina has the sixth highest stroke death rate and is part of the nation's Stroke Belt? The registry captures stroke data and treatment in the state and all EMS authorities will begin using the same stroke transport protocols for stroke patients in line with a stroke facility designation plan.
The death rate is increasing for the Hispanic patient population and in the southern states within the stroke belt. (1) This is a call to arms for neuroscience nursing.
Sampling was stratified across African Americans and whites and three regions: the stroke belt (Alabama, Arkansas, Mississippi, Tennessee, and noncoastal North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia), stroke buckle (coastal plains of North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia), and elsewhere.
15In the Stroke Belt, an 11-state region in southeast U.S., the risk of stroke is 34 percent higher for the general population.
According to the global stroke belt report in 2015, Iran ranks 187 among other countries, representing one of the highest stroke incidence rates in the world [15].
In the US, the so-called "stroke belt ", has been monitored since 1939 [3].
The stall in progress extends beyond the "stroke belt," and has been found across the country, according to the study.
Many were blacks from the "Stroke Belt," an area of the southeastern United States that has an especially high stroke rate.
Paediatric stroke belt: geographic variation in stroke mortality in US children.
Specifically, eight southern states known as the stroke belt have a mortality rate 20% higher than the rest of the nation (North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Tennessee, Mississippi, Alabama, Louisiana, and Arkansas).
Birth and adult residence in the stroke Belt independently predict stroke mortality.