Mephitis mephitis

(redirected from striped skunk)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Mephitis mephitis

see skunk.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
When compared to a striped skunk specimen from the mammal collection of Texas A&M International University (uncatalogued), the tympanic bullae of the hooded skunk were larger.
Nine raccoons (Procyon lotor), 6 Virginia opossums (Didelphis virginiana), and 1 striped skunk (Mephitis mephitis) collected from Keith County, Nebraska were examined for helminth parasites.
On 12 February 2011, a road-killed Striped Skunk was found along Highway 162 in Mendocino National Forest, near the town of Elk Creek, California (UTM: Zone 10S, 552598E, 4388672N, WGS 84).
Rabies challenge of captive striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis) following oral administration of a live vaccinia-vectored rabies vaccine.
One striped skunk visitation was recorded in Tellico during the period of spatial comparison (April--June 1997).
Subsequent telemetry studies of sympatric raccoons and coyotes (Gehrt and Prange, 2007) and sympatric striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis) and coyotes (Prange and Gehrt, 2007) found little to no avoidance of areas used by coyotes.
Although the striped skunk may be trapped and hunted year-around, the spotted skunk is fully protected year-around.
Avian predators were the California gull, common raven (Corvus corax), and red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis), and mammalian predators were the gray fox (Urocyon cinereoargenteus), raccoon (Procyon lotor), rat (Rattus), striped skunk, and Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana; Table 2).
Biological Survey collected a male striped skunk (USNM 118618) on 12 September 1902 from the Castle Mountains in southern Ward County.
The western spotted skunk Spilogale gracilis and the striped skunk Mephitis mephitis occur sympatrically throughout much of western North America (Rosatte and Lariviere, 2003).
These animals included the raccoon, gray fox (Urocyon cinereoargenteus), eastern fox squirrel (Sciurus niger), striped skunk (Mephitis mephitis), Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana), bobcat (Lynx rufus), and coyote (Canis latrans).
putorius was abundant in North Carolina in the Appalachian Mountains and outnumbered the striped skunk (Mephitis mephitis) in most areas and Howell (1921) reported the species as common in Alabama.