string


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Related to string: String theory

string

(string),
A slender cord or cordlike structure.

string

a cord, usually made of fiber, configured in a long thin line.

string

1. twine, very thin rope.
2. a term used to denote a group of dairy cattle housed together in a free stall system based on stage of lactation and production with string 1 being the most recently calved and the highest producing cows, usually containing cows to the time of peak lactation after which they would move to string 2 and subsequently later strings. This allows groups of cattle to be fed separately on the basis of production.

string foreign body
see linear foreign body.
string sign
seen in radiographs of the stenosed gastric pylorus as contrast medium is forced into the limited canal.
References in classic literature ?
He was now the first to take the bow and arrow, so he went on to the pavement to make his trial, but he could not string the bow, for his hands were weak and unused to hard work, they therefore soon grew tired, and he said to the suitors, "My friends, I cannot string it; let another have it, this bow shall take the life and soul out of many a chief among us, for it is better to die than to live after having missed the prize that we have so long striven for, and which has brought us so long together.
True, you were not born to be an archer, but there are others who will soon string it.
He also brought a great ball of lard from what they had in the house, and the suitors warmed the bow and again made trial of it, but they were none of them nearly strong enough to string it.
And he got himself corn, and began to make fire-brew and sell it for strings of money.
With this Teresa hurried out of the house with the letters, and with the string of beads round her neck, and went along thrumming the letters as if they were a tambourine, and by chance coming across the curate and Samson Carrasco she began capering and saying, "None of us poor now, faith
At the same time Robin Hood threw back the cowl of horse's hide from his face and bent Guy of Gisbourne's bow, with a keen, barbed arrow fitted to the string.
And without more ado he tried the string of his long bow, placed a shaft thereon, and drew it to his ear.
Rob looked to his string, while the crowd smiled and whispered at the odd figure he cut, with his vari-colored legs and little cape.
When the people observed I was quiet, they discharged no more arrows; but, by the noise I heard, I knew their numbers increased; and about four yards from me, over against my right ear, I heard a knocking for above an hour, like that of people at work; when turning my head that way, as well as the pegs and strings would permit me, I saw a stage erected about a foot and a half from the ground, capable of holding four of the inhabitants, with two or three ladders to mount it: from whence one of them, who seemed to be a person of quality, made me a long speech, whereof I understood not one syllable.
However, in my opinion, it was extremely prudent, as well as generous: for, supposing these people had endeavoured to kill me with their spears and arrows, while I was asleep, I should certainly have awaked with the first sense of smart, which might so far have roused my rage and strength, as to have enabled me to break the strings wherewith I was tied; after which, as they were not able to make resistance, so they could expect no mercy.
When the workmen found it was impossible for me to break loose, they cut all the strings that bound me; whereupon I rose up, with as melancholy a disposition as ever I had in my life.
Softly throbbing, voice and strings arose on sensuous crests of song, died away to whisperings and caresses, drifted through love-dusks and twilights, or swelled again to love-cries barbarically imperious in which were woven plaintive calls and madnesses of invitation and promise.