stride length


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stride length

Biomechanics The distance between 2 successive placements of the same foot, consisting of 2 step lengths; SL measured between successive positions of the left foot is always the same as that measured by the right foot, unless the subject is walking in a curve

stride length

The distance covered by the combined step length of each limb during gate.
See also: length
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References in periodicals archive ?
As with stride length, step length increased from young adult rats to middle age rats, but then decreased in old age.
Students will explore the relationships between foot length, leg length, stride length, and speed, through data collection, analysis, and basic calculations.
Group B revealed improvement in gait parameters, but significant improvement was seen in paretic step length and non-paretic stride length without affecting cadence and velocity; however, this requires further study.
Characteristics of gait abnormalities among children with TBI include slower gait speed, decreased cadence, shorter stride lengths, and increased gait variability [2, 3].
Video gait analysis was performed on a distance of 18 m with postprocessing of gait speed and stride length. Both parameters significantly improved compared to her pre-LP condition (Figure 3).
Stride length was also shown to be shorter in participants with PD, ranging from 0.49 metres (m) -1.18m (Cioni et al., 1997; Moore et al., 2007), compared to 1.3m-1.45m found in healthy age matched controls (Chien et al., 2006; Svehlik et al., 2009) (see Appendix 3).
The correlation between stride length and vertical head displacement could also be considered moderate, which may indicate that those with a longer stride during the swing may also exhibit greater vertical displacement of the head (see Figure 3).
Likewise, a similar pattern was described for stride length and stride time, with decreases in these parameters occurring later in the afternoon than the reported increases in pain and fatigue.
This is similar to previous findings on strike patterns among soldiers.[14] One gait retraining session offered by a primary care sports medicine physician changing strike pattern and introducing relatively small changes in stride length and cadence can produce a statistically significant change in most parameters of running, but, in particular, in maximal force (N) and maximal pressure (N/[cm.sup.2]) on the heels.
The participants were not allowed to partake in any form of weight reduction exercise but had their walking speed, cadence, step length, step width, and stride length assessed at baseline and at the end of weeks 4, 8, and 12 of the study [20].
The aim of this paper is to propose a universal model based on BP-ANN to estimate pedestrian stride length; this model does not need to predetermine pedestrian parameters each time, which is different from the frequency model in [9,10] and the nonlinear model proposed in [14,15].
Conversely, if your goal is to have a running patient avoid injury, the easiest way to do this is to reduce impact forces by shortening the overall stride length while increasing cadence.