striate


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striate

 [stri´āt] (striated [stri´āt-ed]) having streaks or striae.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

stri·ate

(strī'āt),
Striped; marked by striae.
[L. striatus, furrowed]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

stri·ate

(strī'āt)
Striped; marked by striae.
[L. striatus, furrowed]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

striate

(of plant structures) marked with parallel ridges or depressions.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Basal area of propodeum striate, at least medially; posterobasal area of metepisternum in male unmodified, without a distinct, opaque, spongy structure...2
Basal area of propodeum smooth, not striate at all; posterobasal area of metepisternum in male with distinct, opaque, spongy structure (Fig.
Musclewhite's connection to the police force reminds us that the conventional detective himself participates in this effort to striate space by containing both the crime and its repercussions as well as the criminal, or, in effect, all that threatens to disrupt the boundaries by which the State defines itself and its claims to power.
They explain, "What interests us in operations of striation and smoothing are precisely the passages or combinations: how the forces at work within space continually striate it, and how in the course of its striation it develops other forces and emits new smooth spaces." Deleuze and Guattari go so far as to suggest that smooth space is not preferable in and of itself.
2 and 4); meso-metapleural suture obsolete; posterior surface of propodeum strongly transversely striate (Figs.
Postoperative Complications: The reported incidence of 'Striate keratopathy' in our study was significantly lower in 'M-MSICS' group as compared to 'C-MSICS' group (Statistically Significant, p value 0.01).
The Significant Lower rate of postoperative 'Striate Keratopathy' in M-MSICS technique can be explained from the fact that as nucleus was delivered by viscoexpresion technique and viscosubstance are of corneal endothelium protective nature.
The slatted panels create a curious herringbone effect, rather like woven fabric, that shimmers and striates in the changing light.