stress-related disease

stress-related disease

A general term for any medical condition caused by physical or mental stress, some of which may respond to biofeedback training.
 
Examples
Bruxism, gastric ulcers, hypertension, insomnia, irritable bowel syndrome, migraines, tachyarrhythmias, tension headaches, tics.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Comparison of the serum ferritin and percentage of transferrin saturation as exposure markers of iron-driven oxidative stress-related disease outcomes.
An Egyptian psychiatrist who examined the defendant told prosecutors: "The suspect is sane and does not suffer from any mental or stress-related disease.
The study's findings show for the first time in humans that the diet a mother consumes in late pregnancy can alter the stress response of her offspring, possibly setting the stage for greater susceptibility to cardiovascular problems and other forms of stress-related disease into adulthood.
As the labourers attend to hand-crafted details, the spectacular design takes its toll on Jim, who suffers from a stress-related disease exacerbated by the prolonged building work.
This paper reintroduces biofeedback relaxation training (BFRT) as a mind-body tool for stress management to address stress-related disease in public health practice.
Chapter Fourteen, "Personality, Temperament, and Their Stress-Related Consequences," discuss what personality differences have to do with individual differences in patterns of stress-related disease.
Robert Sapolsky is an expert in the study of stress-related disease amongst primates, a field with obvious relevance to human health studies.
These extreme ear assaults are bringing a new level of noise stress-related disease, right along with their unquestioned curative mission of safely bringing vital aid to those in physical or psychological emergencies.
One study found that 1 attorney in 10 suffered from depression, anxiety, stress-related disease, or unhealthful lifestyles.
future risk of stress-related disease say scientists, who claim that physical parental care can influence genes that determine how well we deal with stress.
Family members in particular are often considered to be at risk of stress-related disease and general health decline.
Furthermore, he has authored the popular book, Why Zebras Don't Get Ulcers: A Guide to Stress, Stress-Related Disease, and Coping, and is a recipient of the MacArthur Fellowship.

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