stress echocardiography


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Related to stress echocardiography: contrast echocardiography

stress ech·o·car·di·og·ra·phy

echocardiographic monitoring of a circulatory challenge, usually exercise.

stress echocardiography

Cardiology An echocardiogram performed when the Pt is exercising. See Radionuclide perfusion imaging.

stress echocardiography

Echocardiography of segments of heart muscle that do not move properly when a patient with coronary artery disease exercises or takes a vasodilating drug (e.g., adenosine or dipyridamole). Stress-induced impairments in regional heart muscle activity are used as markers of obstructions in specific coronary arteries.
References in periodicals archive ?
Lauer, "Use of stress echocardiography to predict mortality in patients with diabetes and known or suspected coronary artery disease," Diabetes Care, vol.
Gardini et al., "Prognostic role of stress echocardiography in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: The International Stress Echo Registry," International Journal of Cardiology, vol.
Preoperative cardiac assessments in patients undergoing liver transplantation include electrocardiography, cardiopulmonary exercise testing, basal and dobutamine stress echocardiography, myocardial perfusion imaging by single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), coronary angiography, and cardiac computed tomography [23].
Now-a-days the most important method for stress echocardiography is the newest method of noninvasive testing to detect CAD.
Despite growing recognition of the AUC and educational programs aimed at cardiologists and primary care physicians to reduce inappropriate stress echocardiography, the use of echocardiography for inappropriate indications has persisted (Widens, Nelson, and Hendel 2013).
Contrast enhanced stress echocardiography has been shown to increase the diagnostic value in the detection of coronary artery disease in severely obese patients [25, 26].
The screening approach may be significantly improved when dobutamine stress echocardiography would be used in every patient.
While resting values of mitral gradients and pulmonary arterial pressures do not always reflect the severity of the disease, stress echocardiography may provide the necessary clues to determine the clinical and hemodynamic impact of MS (4).
offer an illustrated text on cardiology consisting of 120 chapters in two volumes, along with online access to an image bank and a DVD of videos to accompany chapters on transthoracic echocardiography, stress echocardiography, transesophageal echocardiography, real time three-dimensional echocardiography, and electrophysiology studies.
We document the release of BNPsp, N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), and troponin T as measured with a high-sensitivity assay (hsTnT) during dobutamine stress echocardiography (DSE) in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and in healthy volunteers.
Only resting and not stress echocardiography is employed in our clinic.
A study in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology: Cardiovascular Imaging has found that "the absence of inotropic contractile reserve (ICR) predicts the risk of cardiac death in patients with HIV-associated cardiomyopathy." Sixty patients were enrolled in this study which found that "those without ICR during dobutamine stress echocardiography were seven times more likely to die than those with such a reserve." Patients with ICR also "were more likely to improve their left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) over time." The researchers "suggest that people with HIV cardiomyopathy can be stratified by their risk based on ICR, with the option of aggressive treatment for those in the high-risk category."