streptomycin

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streptomycin

 [strep″to-mi´sin]
an aminoglycosideantibiotic produced by Streptomyces griseus; its use is now limited because of the emergence of resistant strains. The sulfate salt is used in combination with other agents in the treatment of tuberculosis and certain other bacterial infections.

strep·to·my·cin

(strep'tō-mī'sin),
An antibiotic agent obtained from Streptomyces griseus that is active against the tubercle bacillus and a large number of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria; also used in the form of dihydrostreptomycin (aldehyde of streptomycin reduced to CH2OH). It is used virtually exclusively in the treatment of tuberculosis; toxicity includes eighth cranial nerve damage leading to deafness and/or vestibular dysfunction.
Synonym(s): streptomycin A

streptomycin

/strep·to·my·cin/ (-mi´sin) an aminoglycoside antibiotic produced by Streptomyces griseus and effective against a wide variety of aerobic gram-negative bacilli and some gram-positive bacteria, including mycobacteria, but to which many of the former have developed resistance; used as the sulfate salt in the treatment of tuberculosis, tularemia, plague, and brucellosis.

streptomycin

(strĕp′tə-mī′sĭn)
n.
An antibiotic, C21H39O12N7, produced by the actinomycete Streptomyces griseus, used to treat tuberculosis and other bacterial infections.

streptomycin

Infectious disease An antibiotic used for TB Adverse effects N&V, dizziness, rash, fever, ototoxicity, nephrotoxicity

strep·to·my·cin

(strep'tō-mī'sin)
Antibiotic agent obtained from Streptomyces griseus active against the tubercle bacillus and a large number of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria; also used in the form of dihydrostreptomycin. It is used virtually exclusively in the treatment of tuberculosis; toxicity includes eighth cranial nerve damage leading to deafness and/or vestibular dysfunction. Also called streptomycin A.

streptomycin

An aminoglycoside antibiotic drug used to treat some rare infections such as BRUCELLOSIS, GLANDERS, PLAGUE, TUBERCULOSIS and TULARAEMIA. It is avoided for commoner infections because of its side effects, which include deafness and TINNITUS. The drug is on the WHO official list.

streptomycin

an ANTIBIOTIC produced by a soil ACTINOMYCETE, Streptomyces griseus, which is active against many bacteria, particularly Gram-negative bacteria (see GRAM'S STAIN). Streptomycin inhibits PROTEIN SYNTHESIS in bacteria by causing misreading of the GENETIC CODE on mRNA. It also inhibits initiation of protein synthesis by interfering with the binding of initiator tRNA to the ribosome. see TRANSLATION.

streptomycin

antibiotic agent obtained from Streptomyces ; active against tubercle bacilli, and many Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms

strep·to·my·cin

(strep'tō-mī'sin)
An antibiotic agent obtained from Streptomyces griseus that is active against the tubercle bacillus and many gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria; also used in the form of dihydrostreptomycin; used almost exclusively in treatment of tuberculosis; toxicity includes eighth cranial nerve damage leading to deafness or vestibular dysfunction.

streptomycin (strep´tōmī´sin),

n an antimicrobial drug often used to treat infections caused by gram-negative bacteria (such as tuberculosis). Though no human studies have been conducted, streptomycin administered during pregnancy or breastfeeding may cause damage to the ear of the fetus or infant.

streptomycin

one of the oldest of the aminoglycoside antibiotics. Because of its widespread use many previously susceptible gram-negative bacteria have developed a resistance to it and it has lost a great deal of its effectiveness and popularity. It is most effective against leptospira and haemophilus-associated infections. Like all other members of the group, streptomycin is absorbed poorly from the alimentary tract and must be given parenterally, usually by intramuscular injection for systemic effect. The group has moderate toxicity but this is of minor importance in food animals. Even in companion animals the risk is small but deafness and vestibular disturbances can occur, particularly in cats. Dihydrostreptomycin is a derivative and is used as an alternative to the parent antibiotic.