streptomycin


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streptomycin

 [strep″to-mi´sin]
an aminoglycosideantibiotic produced by Streptomyces griseus; its use is now limited because of the emergence of resistant strains. The sulfate salt is used in combination with other agents in the treatment of tuberculosis and certain other bacterial infections.

strep·to·my·cin

(strep'tō-mī'sin),
An antibiotic agent obtained from Streptomyces griseus that is active against the tubercle bacillus and a large number of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria; also used in the form of dihydrostreptomycin (aldehyde of streptomycin reduced to CH2OH). It is used virtually exclusively in the treatment of tuberculosis; toxicity includes eighth cranial nerve damage leading to deafness and/or vestibular dysfunction.
Synonym(s): streptomycin A

streptomycin

(strĕp′tə-mī′sĭn)
n.
An antibiotic, C21H39O12N7, produced by the actinomycete Streptomyces griseus, used to treat tuberculosis and other bacterial infections.

streptomycin

Infectious disease An antibiotic used for TB Adverse effects N&V, dizziness, rash, fever, ototoxicity, nephrotoxicity

strep·to·my·cin

(strep'tō-mī'sin)
Antibiotic agent obtained from Streptomyces griseus active against the tubercle bacillus and a large number of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria; also used in the form of dihydrostreptomycin. It is used virtually exclusively in the treatment of tuberculosis; toxicity includes eighth cranial nerve damage leading to deafness and/or vestibular dysfunction. Also called streptomycin A.

streptomycin

An aminoglycoside antibiotic drug used to treat some rare infections such as BRUCELLOSIS, GLANDERS, PLAGUE, TUBERCULOSIS and TULARAEMIA. It is avoided for commoner infections because of its side effects, which include deafness and TINNITUS. The drug is on the WHO official list.

streptomycin

an ANTIBIOTIC produced by a soil ACTINOMYCETE, Streptomyces griseus, which is active against many bacteria, particularly Gram-negative bacteria (see GRAM'S STAIN). Streptomycin inhibits PROTEIN SYNTHESIS in bacteria by causing misreading of the GENETIC CODE on mRNA. It also inhibits initiation of protein synthesis by interfering with the binding of initiator tRNA to the ribosome. see TRANSLATION.

strep·to·my·cin

(strep'tō-mī'sin)
An antibiotic agent obtained from Streptomyces griseus that is active against the tubercle bacillus and many gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria; also used in the form of dihydrostreptomycin; used almost exclusively in treatment of tuberculosis; toxicity includes eighth cranial nerve damage leading to deafness or vestibular dysfunction.
References in periodicals archive ?
i) Penicillin, streptomycin, oxytetracycline and neomycin are the antibiotics most often used in planktonic cultures with success, individually or in combination and they must be prioritized in the choice, either for phytoplanktonic or zooplanktonic organisms.
Further, in isolation, streptomycin showed highest resistance of 4.6% followed by rifampicin 4.0%, isoniazid 3.7% and ethambutol 1.9%.
Streptomycin is an antibiotic which is also very effective in treating painful conditions.
acidophilus to erythromycin, streptomycin and tetracycline, and moderate correlation coefficient (r=0.63 to 0.83) to ampicillin gentamicin and vancomycin.
Zhang et al., "Detection of streptomycin resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates using four molecular methods in China," Acta Genetica Sinica, vol.
Streptomycin, although recommended, has a lot of limitations in terms of its mode of administration.
Streptomycin suppresses autotony behavior in rats and reduces autonomy scores when applied locally11.
For example mutation rate for resistance against streptomycin is 1 in 108 1 in 107 for ethambutol and 1 in 109 for cycloserine (Gangadharam 1984).
The 1948 MRC streptomycin trial could perhaps be called the pinnacle of the OEBM in the sense that it provided the most useful scientific information about how to treat tuberculosis, and it opened the era of RCTs in medicine, which were perfect examples of the testing of the falsifiable hypotheses a la Popper in medical research.
High level streptomycin and kanamycin resistance in enterococci are mediated by aph(3')-IIIa gene encoding aminoglycoside phosphotransferase enzyme, APH(3,)-IIIa [2].
Tetracycline, along with the antibiotic streptomycin, is used in organic production to control a disease known as fire blight that affects apples and pears.