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flu·men

, pl.

flu·mi·na

(flū'men, flū'min-ă),
A flowing, or stream.
Synonym(s): stream
[L.]

stream

(strem)
A steady flow of a liquid.

cathode stream

Negatively charged electrons emitted from a cathode and accelerated in a straight line to interact with an anode. X-ray photons are then produced.
See: Bremsstrahlung radiation; ray, cathode

flu·men

, pl. flumina (flū'mĕn, -mi-nă)
A flowing, or stream.
Synonym(s): stream.
[L.]
References in periodicals archive ?
In COCA, playlet, streamlet, froglet and bosslet have very low frequencies, and wifelet does not occur at all in this corpus.
Its gladsome glades are girt about with mists, And o'er its sward a slumberous streamlet twists, Flowing like Lethe, soundless; thence who lists May drink his full, and naught remember more.
It's the last link of a public greenbelt that will connect hillside streamlets with Amazon Creek as it flows through Eugene and toward Fern Ridge Lake.
Trace them to their source, then check back monthly even if the running streamlet dries up.
In other words, the effect of the disorientation is relatively weaker as the spun streamlet gets away from the spun nozzle, so evidence of orientation is observed even in the as spun.
Mechthild of Magdeburg, in her book The Flowing Light of the Godhead, writes of an erotic "embrace" in which lover and beloved are "one, as water with wine" (9); and Teresa of Avila describes "spiritual marriage" as being "like rain falling from heaven into a river or stream, becoming one and the same liquid, so that the river and the rain water cannot be divided; or it resembles a streamlet flowing into the ocean, which cannot afterwards be disunited from it" (176).
When the rare rain comes, the rill becomes a streamlet. The seeders can also be used in large gullies.
By the 2,000-mile mark on the Lena, as it sweeps northward toward the Arctic Circle, the fiver that began as a mountain streamlet is a swollen, braided giant, more than 19 miles from one true bank to the other.
In 'Nell', written some two months later, Wright strikes a more extreme pose; the repining lover longs for extinction with his beloved, as the poem concludes, I am standing by the streamlet where we used to meet of old, 'Neath the drooping willow branches in the dell, But my steps are getting feeble and my heart is growing cold,-- Would to God that I were laid beside thee, Nell.