sample

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Related to stratified random sample: sampling techniques, cluster sample

sample

 
1. a representative part taken to typify the whole.
2. a subset of a population that is selected for inclusion in a research study.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

sam·ple

(sam'pĕl),
1. A specimen of a whole entity small enough to involve no threat or damage to the whole; an aliquot.
2. A selected subset of a population; a sample may be random or nonrandom (haphazard), representative or nonrepresentative.
[M.E. ensample, fr. L. exemplum, example]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

sam·ple

(sam'pĕl)
1. A specimen of a whole entity small enough to involve no threat or damage to the whole; an aliquot.
2. A selected subset of a population; a sample may be random (haphazard) or nonrandom, representative or nonrepresentative.
3. A piece or portion of a whole that will demonstrate the characteristics or qualities of that whole.
[M.E. ensample, fr. L. exemplum, example]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

sample

any portion of a whole, such as a small part of a population, collected for examination.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

sampling 

The selection of a group of subjects from a population. This is usually done for the purpose of experimentation. The part of the population selected is called the sample: it is usually considered to be representative of a given population. A good sample must be random, i.e. every possible member of that population has an equal chance of being selected. Otherwise, it is said to be biased. Sampling can extend either across geographical areas (spatial sampling) or over a period of time (temporal sampling).
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann

sam·ple

(sam'pĕl)
1. Specimen of a whole entity small enough to involve no threat or damage to the whole; an aliquot.
2. Selected subset of a population; may be random or nonrandom (haphazard), representative or nonrepresentative.
[M.E. ensample, fr. L. exemplum, example]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
By discounting groups 1 and 2, where the number of men and women are not 200 to 50, you move from an SRS to a stratified random sample. A SRS must include every set if individuals having an equal chance to be the sample actually selected for your study.
All 41 members of the occupational therapists' special interest group were surveyed together with the stratified random sample, n = 50, of the 214 members of the physiotherapists, group.
I conducted a pilot study on a stratified random sample of 35 SSAs in summer 1990 to validate the questionnaire.
The 1986 NMFS is a stratified random sample of 18,733 (approximately 1%) deaths from all causes among U.S.
The survey followed multistage stratified random sample design.
To provide a more representative statewide picture, a stratified random sample of schools with TNVPK classrooms was drawn and enrolled in an age cutoff regression-discontinuity designs.
In the survey--a stratified random sample of all lenders producing at least $50 million per year in residential single-family mortgages--lenders of all sizes indicated they plan to increase information technology (IT) investments in 2011.
Conducted by an independent research firm, it includes responses from more than 1,400 CFOs from a stratified random sample of U.S.
He compared trends in acute MI survival in rheumatoid arthritis patients and diabetic patients in the National Inpatient Sample for 1991-2001, a large stratified random sample of U.S.
GAO reached these conclusions on the basis of its analysis of a stratified random sample of 24 projects that use federal lands.
Participants included 21 teachers of 4-year-old children from a stratified random sample of 21 child care centers.