strangle


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Related to strangle: strangle strategy

choke

 [chōk]
1. to interrupt respiration by obstruction or compression; called also strangle.
2. the condition resulting from such interruption; called also strangulation.

stran·gle

(strang'gĕl),
To suffocate; to choke; to compress the trachea so as to prevent sufficient passage of air.
[G. strangaloō, to choke, fr. strangalē, a halter]

strangle

/stran·gle/ (strang´g'l) choke (1).

strangle

(străng′gəl)
v. stran·gled, stran·gling, stran·gles
v.tr.
a. To kill by squeezing the throat so as to choke or suffocate; throttle.
b. To cut off the oxygen supply of; smother.
v.intr.
1. To become strangled.
2. To die from suffocation or strangulation; choke.

stran′gler n.

strangle

[strang′gəl]
Etymology: L, strangulare, to choke
to cause an interruption of breathing by compressing or constricting the trachea. Also called strangulate. strangulated, adj.

stran·gle

(strang'gĕl)
To suffocate; to choke; to compress the trachea so as to prevent sufficient passage of air.
[G. strangaloō, to choke, fr. strangalē, a halter]
References in periodicals archive ?
The couple had just watched a film which depicted a husband trying to strangle his wife.
She was quite clear to them that the man had tried to strangle her.
The ERA can confirm that there has not been a case of strangles in the UAE Thoroughbred racing population for more than 10 years and there were no signs suggestive of strangles at any time in horses participating in the Dubai International Racing Carnival," the ERA statement said.
Having done so, it turned out not to be strangles, which was a huge relief all round.
She will address the launch event, held at the Royal Society of Medicine in central London, and discuss her own experiences of dealing with strangles, organisers have said.
Strangles can also be spread through contamination of food or water, or from the hands and clothing of stable staff.
Everyone wants to know if your horse has strangles, but no one wants to know you when it has.
Caused by the bacterium Streptococcus equi, strangles has many unpleasant effects including abscessed lymph nodes of the head and neck, which can in severe cases restrict the airway, leading to the name 'strangles'.
This data can then be used to assess the impact strangles has on the equestrian industry and promote the aims of the new code.
Plas Uchaf owner David Rae stressed his yard was free of strangles but he said the club's decision to cancel was the "responsible way forward".
Strangles attacks a horse's larynx, leading to swollen glands that can restrict airways.
THE Animal Health Trust and British Horse Society yesterday unveiled a two-year public awareness campaign which they hope will raise pounds 250,000 to combat the pernicious equine respiratory disease known as strangles.