strain gauge

(redirected from strain gauges)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

strain gauge

a device, employing the Wheatstone bridge principle, used for accurate measurement of forces such as strain, stress, or pressure.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Resistance change is measured the same way as in previous cases: first in two steps difference of resistance of strain gauges and connecting wires are obtained and then measurement of the strain (resistance change of active strain gauges) of loaded construction is performed in preset moments of time.
Available in grid lengths of 2 mm and 5 mm as well as in different versions, such as linear, T (with two measuring grids) or R (with three measuring grids) rosettes, depending on the application's requirements, the KFU strain gauges are also available with temperature responses matched to steel, austenitic steel, and aluminium.
Strain gauges are electrical devices that can measure strain at a specific location.
One or more strain gauges are cemented to the surface of each prong to sense the deformation caused by applied biting force.
The strain gauges were stuck on thin, cuboidal beams made of tool steal.
Additionally, in comparison to both strain gauge and contact extensometers, Video Gauge technology enables the results to be repeatedly analysed after the test has been carried out particularly useful if there is only one test piece.
Since 2010, the Daventry facility has assessed alternative methods of measuring strain that aim at mitigating some of the limitations found in strain gauges. Particular focus has been placed on two optical variants: laser light source and high-resolution cameras.
It is possible to measure induced stress on the toroidal core using strain gauges and the bridge system.
If strain gauges are used, it is possible to achieve good results with a small amount of measurement points, and the measurement equipment can be set so individual loading components can be scanned directly during flight.