stout

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stout

(stowt) [O.Fr. estout, bold]
Having a bulky body.
References in periodicals archive ?
Katarina Jorda Kramolisova has established herself as a distinctive dramatic coloratura soprano noted for a soft, fervid voice capable of passing over to determined stoutness and strength.
In Jenny Smith's short story "A Weighty Matter" of 1893, the protagonist is teased by her friends for her stoutness.
Immensely broad-chested and muscular, though not tall, he weighed eighteen stone [about 250 lbs]; yet in spite of his stoutness he was exceedingly hardy and active, and a wonderful horseman.
Give strength to their arms, stoutness to their hearts, steadfastness in their faith.
12) Tarsometatarsus shape: The torsometatarsus varied in stoutness.
Once in charge, very angrily, Stoutness admonished the cockeyed boy, "Is this what you get taught from them?
In the third section, he characterizes the stoutness of the earth's pillars by expanding from the strength of unison octaves .
In fact, the entire 30 years of data assembled here testify to journalists' stoutness in refusing to crumple under repeated assaults of downsizing, profit-snatching and mission-cramping.
This progressive decay, generation by generation, bears out Hawthorne's prophecy in "Earth's Holocaust," in which he writes, "all the old stoutness, fervor, nobleness, generosity, and magnanimity of the race would disappear; these qualities, as they affirmed, requiring blood for their nourishment" (10:389, 390).
For several weeks Pooh has been doing his Stoutness Exercises, which involve stretching up high and bending down to touch toes.
The top flight's monicker has a new-found stoutness, those oval ball aristocrats Harlequins will be required to demonstrate theirs, dodging molehills and defenders in dimly-lit fields, and the man who embodied that quality has left centre stage for good.
For example, although thinness is as significant as stoutness as a literary subject for Austen, she also agrees with her culture's general assumption that a larger body is stronger than a smaller body, and that thinness connotes frailty and fatness, strength.