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stone

 [stōn]
2. a unit of weight in Great Britain, the equivalent of 14 pounds (avoirdupois), or about 6.34 kg.
kidney stone see kidney stone.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

stone

(stōn),
1. Synonym(s): calculus
2. A British unit of weight for the human body, equal to 14 pounds.
[A.S. stān]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

stone

(stōn)
n.
An abnormal concretion in the body, usually formed of mineral salts and most commonly found in the gallbladder, kidney, or urinary bladder; a calculus.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
An indurated material, generally composed of crystallised minerals, or, less commonly, organic materials—e.g., bile, cholesterol
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

stone

Concrement Medtalk An indurated material, generally composed of crystallized minerals, les commonly, organic materials–eg, bile, cholesterol. See Bladder stone, Gallstone, Kidney stone, Magnesium ammonium phosphate stone, Salivary duct stone.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

stone

(stōn)
1. Synonym(s): calculus.
2. A British unit of weight for the human body, equal to 14 lb. or 6.36 kg.
[A.S. stān]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

stone

(stōn)
1. Synonym(s): calculus.
2. An abrading instrument.
3. A British unit of weight for the human body, equal to 14 pounds.
[A.S. stān]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about stone

Q. Why do i get kidney stones? I am 38 and have had three stones pass so far. Is it the coffee, the meat, the stress, or the damned DNA?! My uncle is in his 50s and has passed over 30 stones!

A. Kidney stones are very common and even without the genetic or familial background people tend to get them. Of course, the more family predisposition you have, the higher are your chances of developing them, which is probably why you did. Also, a diet rich with dairy and calcium can cause your body to store excess calcium, that tends to calcify and create stones. Not drinking enough fluid is also one of the reasons.

Q. how do i cure tonsil stones (tonsiloth)?

A. There are very little literature about this subject, but I heard about treatment in which the crypts (deep and narrow grooves on the tongue in which the stones form) are burned with laser.

As far as I know these stones don't cause damage by themselves so it's not such a common treatment.

You may read more here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tonsillolith

Q. Would kidney stones affect a PSA reading? Would drinking lots of grapefruit juice affect a PSA reading? My husband's PSA reading jumped from a 4.2 to a 17 in @ 2 years' time. How can that be? This man takes all sorts of supplements and really watches his diet. He also takes good care of his body, and does NOT look or act 68.

A. You should get your parathyroid gland checked out. Your calcium level might be causing the kidney stones.

More discussions about stone
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Mrs Stonely, of Upper Colwyn Bay, has mobility problems after being accidentally shot in the leg in 1958.
Mrs Stonely said: "To me, scum are people with knives and guns on the streets and not someone who takes a parking space."
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Gareth Stonely and John Rigby couldn't save stunned Wepre as Callum Stewart (2), John Parker and James Stuart struck for Hawarden.