stomal


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Related to stomal: stomal ulcer

sto·mal

(stō'măl),
Relating to a stoma.

stomal

[stō′məl]
Etymology: Gk, mouth
pertaining to one or more stomata or mouthlike openings. Also spelled stomatal.

sto·mal

(stō'măl)
Relating to a stoma.

stomal

(stō′măl) [Gr. stoma, mouth]
Concerning a stoma.
References in periodicals archive ?
Since silver gray mulch has a bright surface and reflects more light, it had the highest stomal conductance (128.
Data including the age, sex, cause for intubation and tracheostomy, days of intubation/ventilation, APACHE II Score, duration of procedure, lowest intraprocedural SpO, lowest intraprocedural BP, intraprocedural complications such as bleeding, loss of airway for more than 20 seconds, subcutaneous emphysema, tracheal ring fracture and paratracheal placement of the tube; postprocedural complications such as accidental decannulation, pneumothorax, hemorrhage, stomal granulation, infection of stoma or a new lung infiltrate within 48hours of tracheostomy; duration of tracheostomy; planned decannulation and mortality were recorded.
Chewing food well and increasing hydration are primary factors for preventing stomal blockages (Burch, 2011; Piras & Hurley, 2011).
At six-month follow-up, the patient had good urostomy function, protuberant and healthy stoma, and no issues with stomal appliance fit (Figure 3).
Infection was defined as clinical evidence of stomal swelling, erythema, purulent discharge, and increasing pain.
7% as the most frequent intermediate complication while stomal infection and scabs formation were second most commonly encountered complication as 7.
Alternatively, simple skin grafting of the granulation tissue around the fistula allows eventual application of a stomal appliance, but the patient then requires definitive surgery for closure of the defect and fistula at a later stage.
The subacute type usually presents at 3 to 4 weeks after surgery and is associated with ischemia, stomal ulcers, and fibrosis at the gastro-jejunostomy.
we gratefully acknowledge the expert clinical care and cooperation of numerous clinicians at each of the hospitals, including: i) Anaesthetist: Michele Joseph; ii) Surgeons: Peter Nottle, Roger Wale, David watters, Simon Crowley, Darrin Goodall wilson, Mal Steele, Michael Grigg; iii) Nurses: Anne Spranklin, Ross O'Brien, Vanessa Cuthbert; Vicki wall, wendy Brack, Sarah Burns, Lauren Savage; iv) Dieticians: Ibolya Nyulasi, Sarah Jukes, Michelle McPhee, Anna Boltong; v) Physiotherapists: Jim Sayer, Gemma Taylor, Val Bulmer, Pratichi Vasavada; vi) Occupational Therapist: Kristen Payne; vii) Stomal therapist: Stefan Demur.
Stomal nurses, diabetic educators and wound care specialists are just some of the specialty educators that are unavailable to night duty nurses.
As well as the normal risks of surgery, there can be complications including gastric band slippage, gallstones, a blockage known as a stomal stenosis after gastric bypass, and the development of food intolerances.
Stomal granulation tissue frequently develops, and nearly all patients have some degree of tracheal narrowing at the site of the tracheostoma.