stoke

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stoke

 [stōk]
a unit of kinematic viscosity, equal to 10−4 m2 per second.

stoke

(stōk),
A unit of kinematic viscosity, that of a fluid with a viscosity of 1 poise and a density of 1 g/mL; equal to 10-4 m2/second.
[George Gabriel Stokes]

stoke

(stōk)
A unit of kinematic viscosity, that of a fluid with a viscosity of 1 poise and a density of 1 g/mL; equal to 10-4 square meter per second.
[George Gabriel Stokes]

Stokes,

Sir George Gabriel, English physicist and mathematician, 1819-1903.
stoke - unit of kinematic viscosity.
Stokes law - relationship of the rate of fall of a small sphere in a viscous fluid.
Stokes lens - used to diagnose astigmatism.
References in periodicals archive ?
For a book on strategy, Stoker ignores or underplays some key strategic issues.
Stoker naturally examines the military men on the other side of the political-military equation.
According to Variety.com, the plot sees Stoker's story re-imagined in the tale of a female New York-based TV journalist who travels to Romania to interview a notorious European arms dealer, who is a modern-day Dracula.
Stoker, a philosophy professor with a doctoral degree from Georgetown University in Washington, D.C., brought forum theater to Chattanooga State this year after moving from the Netherlands, where she taught at the University of Amsterdam.
Bram Stoker is included as one of the characters in the sequel.
Understandably, the Stoker family have been wary of getting involved in any other Dracula-related project...
Toda esta fantastica realidad, se debilita en la segunda mitad de la novela de Stoker, en la que vemos a este mitico personaje a merced de sus perseguidores que son inferiores a el en varios aspectos.
Klinger recognizes that although the character of Dracula has become a timeless icon, Stoker's novel is firmly rooted in late Victorian culture and illuminates the fissures and contradictions of British (and Western) culture in the last decades of the nineteenth century.
When compared to Leavis's esteemed realism, Stoker's fiction and Gothic fiction generally does look like an awful mess.
In particular Dracula, and Stoker's work as a whole, suffers from a lack of attention (save that from Sparks) to debates of the late nineteenth century that inform the creation of the vampire as a symbol of Victorian anxieties of impurity and corruption arising from illness and disease.
Gerry Stoker, Why Politics Matters: Making Democracy Work, Palgrave Macmillan, 2006
WALLY "Stoker" Arnold survived one of Merseyside's greatest maritime disasters.