stock

(redirected from stocks)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Stock

(stok),
Wolfgang, German ophthalmologist, 1874-1956. See: Spielmeyer-Stock disease.

stock

(stok),
All the populations of organisms derived from an isolate without any implication of homogeneity or characterization.
[A.S. stoc]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

stock

  1. a rooted stem into which a SCION is inserted for grafting (see GRAFT). 2 a mating group used in a breeding programme.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

stock

(stok)
All the populations of organisms derived from an isolate without any implication of homogeneity or characterization.
[A.S. stoc]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
* Bristol-Myers Squibb (OTC: BMYMP) stock achieved a new 52-week low on Friday morning, hitting $800.00 and moving 0.0% (flat).
* Banco Santander (NYSE:SAN) stock dropped to a yearly low on Friday of $4.13.
After a long spurt, oil prices backed off a bit in late 2006, driving down stocks in the energy sector.
If you're reluctant to select your own sleeper stocks, you might be interested in Claymore/Sabrient Stealth (AMEX: STH), a new exchange-traded fund designed to track the Sabrient Stealth Index of companies flying under the radar screen of Wall Street analysts.
"Portfolio indebtedness" refers to indebtedness that is directly attributable to an investment in portfolio stock. The tax code does not define "directly attributable." In the Congressional Record, however, the phrase describes a direct relationship between the debt and the stock purchase--the company either incurs the debt to purchase the stock or the debt is directly traceable to the stock purchase.
The government claimed the subsidiary was adequately capitalized and, therefore, that OBH had borrowed the money to buy stock. The district court rejected the government's argument.
Stock options will and should continue to be a major component of executive compensation, given the potential for superior long-term wealth-creation power for executives and the benefits for shareholders.
CEO Steve Jobs voluntarily turned in 55 million stock options, with a weighted average exercise price of $18.31, in exchange for 10 million restricted shares worth $74.5 million (based on a $7.45 share price).
Between 1998 and 2000 in the lead-up to the IT bubble, however, both stocks massively outperformed the Nikkei 225.
I believe that such large-cap, bombed-out stocks could be the drivers for the next major rally in Japanese stocks, and would be looking to begin accumulating such large caps on noticeable weakness, knowledgeable of the fact that as long as such large caps continue bumping along the bottom, there will be no substantial new highs in the Tokyo market.
Groucho Marx and many other people bought stocks with money borrowed against their --.
That is, compensation cost arising from the issuance of stock options may be expensed or capitalized in the same way as cash compensation.