stock


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Stock

(stok),
Wolfgang, German ophthalmologist, 1874-1956. See: Spielmeyer-Stock disease.

stock

(stok),
All the populations of organisms derived from an isolate without any implication of homogeneity or characterization.
[A.S. stoc]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

stock

  1. a rooted stem into which a SCION is inserted for grafting (see GRAFT). 2 a mating group used in a breeding programme.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

stock

(stok)
All the populations of organisms derived from an isolate without any implication of homogeneity or characterization.
[A.S. stoc]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Under this method, the company calculates compensation based on the excess of the value of stock over the option exercise price on each reporting period.
Most stock options that predate the effective date of FAS 123(R) are subject to the new rules.
* Banco Santander (NYSE:SAN) stock dropped to a yearly low on Friday of $4.13.
* Equinor (NYSE:EQNR) stock set a new 52-week low of $17.30 on Friday, moving down 0.66%.
Like McClatchy, it has taken on debt to make acquisitions, pressuring the stock price from $41 to $25, but Lee's new strategy should pay off in 2007.
(NYSE: JRC) focuses its publishing in the Northeast and Midwest, The company is attracting private equity interest, indicating that sophisticated investors think the stock is cheap at under $6, down from almost $17 a year ago.
After passage of the AJCA, certain banks and bank and financial holding companies do not have to include in passive investment income (PII), interest income and dividends on assets required to be held by the bank or holding company (e.g., Federal Reserve, Federal Home Loan Bank stock or participation certificates).
Each shareholder will also reflect an increase in stock basis for the deemed capital contribution.
Its not only the Enrons and WorldComs of the world that have to worry about lawsuits when stock price declines hurt employees who invested in company stock; other companies are being sued as well.
Enron is the poster child for companies whose employees had too much of their 401(k) invested in company stock. Some 57.3% of its employees' 401(k) assets were invested in Enron stock when it fell in value by almost 99% in 2001.
CEO Steve Jobs voluntarily turned in 55 million stock options, with a weighted average exercise price of $18.31, in exchange for 10 million restricted shares worth $74.5 million (based on a $7.45 share price).
But the original stock option grants would be worth $3.7 billion.